Cosenza Castle

Cosenza, Italy

The Castello Svevo ('Swabian' or Hohenstaufen Castle) was originally built by the Saracens on the ruins of the ancient Rocca Brutia, around the year 1000. The castle was restored by Frederick II, Holy Roman Emperor, adding the octagonal tower to the original structure, in 1239. According to tradition, his son Henry lived in this castle, as a prisoner at his father's command. Louis III of Naples and Margaret of Savoy married in the castle and they both settled there in 1432.

All signs of the ancient Saracen structure have now disappeared. In the internal cloister, the modifications made by the Bourbons in order to convert it into a prison can also be seen. The entrance-hall is covered by ogival arches with engraved brackets. A wide corridor is dominated by some fleur-de-lis from the House of Anjou coat of arms. They are engraved on the ribbed Hohenstaufen arches.

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Details

Founded: c. 1000 AD
Category: Castles and fortifications in Italy

Rating

4.4/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

John DiMaggio (5 months ago)
Nothing special as far as castles go. Nice views of Cosenza though
Giosuè Josh Bennati (5 months ago)
Astonishing place! The guides are truly prepared and able to transmit their passion for the castle. Most definitely one of the best spots to visit in Calabria, strongly recommended!!
Felix “Lansamur” K. (13 months ago)
Good Guide around the castle, fair prices. Parking lots are available, you can also walk of course - steep climbs included. ;)
Laíssa Antunes - Vida na Itália (15 months ago)
Amazing place!
Luca Trani (2 years ago)
Nice place, great view, but it seemed to me to be abandoned for itself,nobody in there from the staff, nor a visitor
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