Cosenza Cathedral

Cosenza, Italy

The exact origins of the Cosenza Cathedral are unknown; it was probably built during the first half of the 11th century. An earthquake destroyed the cathedral on 9 June 1184, and rebuilding was completed by 1222 when the cathedral was consecrated by Emperor Frederick II.

At some point during the first half of the 18th century the church was covered by a baroque superstructure which obliterated the original structure and its works of art. In the first half of the 19th century the façade was transformed in neo-gothic style, which completely changed its character. At the end of the 19th century, Archbishop Camillo Sorgente entrusted the work to Pisanti, who recovered the original old arches and the ancient structure of the church. In the 1940s the work was finally completed.

In the transept is the tomb of Isabella of Aragon, wife of king Philip III of France. A long aisle links the Duomo to the archbishops' palace, the Palazzo Arcivescovile, which houses an Immacolata by Luca Giordano. One can also admire the rare and precious Stauroteca, a gift from Emperor Frederick II to the Duomo upon consecration. The work was produced in the royal goldsmiths' workshops, better known as “Tiraz”, in a cultural environment which blended Arabic, Byzantine and Western cultural elements.

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Details

Founded: 1222
Category: Religious sites in Italy

Rating

4.7/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Mark Vassallo (2 years ago)
Ancient cathedral. Imposing.
Edoardo Rizzuti (2 years ago)
Well preserved romantic church. Interesting place and atmosphere but it does not host art pieces, excursions and other cultural activities. Mainly used for religious activities.
Bryan Guilcapi (3 years ago)
Beautiful Old Cosenza, a clean place and beautiful church
Rosina Porco (5 years ago)
The church Ware I got merried just beautiful
Matt R (5 years ago)
The church is one of the iconic landmarks of Cosenza and it’s situated in the old part of the city. The building blends very well with the surrounding area, the old town, an example on how towns were setup along the Mediterranean coast in the past. The exterior view of the church is perhaps the best part as the gothic facade fits pretty well with the decadent buildings around it. Church interiors are also nice, even though there are not so many things to see besides a tomb, few paintings and the overall gothic architecture.
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