Sammallahdenmäki

Rauma, Finland

Sammallahdenmäki is a Bronze age burial site including 36 granite burial cairns dating back more than 3000 years, from 1500 to 500 BC. Sammallahdenmäki is an exceptionally valuable example of Finland’s Bronze Age culture because it presents the ancient monuments in a well-preserved natural milieu. It’s designated as the UNESCO World Heritage Site in 1999.

Two of the most spectacular cairns are the quadrangular "Chuch Floor" and the dike-like "Long Ruin of Huilu". A typical feature of the Sammallahdenmäki cairns are the stone cists, boxlike structures formed by stone flags standing on edge and forming end and side walls or only one or the other. The cist may have originally contained a body in a wooden coffin, or the dead person may have been wrapped in animal skins. On the other hand, the cist may also have served as a receptacle for the ashes of a cremation burial. Remains of cists are still visible in some of the unexcavated cairns as well as in one cairn reconstructed after investigations.

Direction signs guide the visitor to Sammallahdenmäki from Highway 12 (Rauma–Huittinen). At the township of Lappi, the route turns north along Road 2070. After ca. 3.5 km the route turns left along a side road marked by a direction sign. The route ends at an information sign.

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Details

Founded: 1500 - 500 B.C.
Category: Prehistoric and archaeological sites in Finland
Historical period: Bronze Age (Finland)

Rating

4.2/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Tijs Desmaele (2 years ago)
Great place to visit
Sandor Kovacs (2 years ago)
Interesting place!
Kovács Sándor (2 years ago)
Interesting place, but you need some higher level of imagination power to connect the life of people lived 3300 years ago to the remained ruins.
עופר רייך (2 years ago)
Nice prehistoric ruins. Beautiful nature.
Mike Going (2 years ago)
A very interesting place to visit. Toilets nearby. We parked our camper van and stayed the night in the carpark. The trail markers are very obscure and hard to see, thus making it hard to find the trail when there is heavy snow about.
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