Central Pori Church

Pori, Finland

The Central Pori Church is a church in Gothic Revival style. It is the largest church in region of Satakunta, and one of the largest in Finland. The church was built in between 1859 and 1863, when it was inaugurated. It is known for its unique church tower, which is made of cast iron. The tower is 72 metres (236 ft) tall. The church was designed by T. Chiewitz and C.J. von Heideken. Glass paintings in the church are made by Magnus Enckell.

Reference: Wikipedia

Comments

Your name



Address

Yrjönkatu, Pori, Finland
See all sites in Pori

Details

Founded: 1859-1863
Category: Religious sites in Finland
Historical period: Russian Grand Duchy (Finland)

Rating

4.2/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Raimo Kariniemi (3 years ago)
Vaikka käyn harvakseen joka kerta se on sykättyvä tunne tässä upeassa kirkossa.
Salvatore Giordano (3 years ago)
Worth a visit
Vanessa Hernandez (3 years ago)
I haven't been inside yet as it was closed when I walked to it but from the outside the church is gorgeous. It's next to the river and there are walking trails around the area so you can walk there.
Peter Perdaen (3 years ago)
Nice looking church. One of the few interesting things to see in Pori.
Reetta Räisänen (5 years ago)
Beautiful church
Powered by Google

Featured Historic Landmarks, Sites & Buildings

Historic Site of the week

Caerleon Roman Amphitheatre

Built around AD 90 to entertain the legionaries stationed at the fort of Caerleon (Isca), the impressive amphitheatre was the Roman equivalent of today’s multiplex cinema. Wooden benches provided seating for up to 6,000 spectators, who would gather to watch bloodthirsty displays featuring gladiatorial combat and exotic wild animals.

Long after the Romans left, the amphitheatre took on a new life in Arthurian legend. Geoffrey of Monmouth, the somewhat imaginative 12th-century scholar, wrote in his History of the Kings of Britain that Arthur was crowned in Caerleon and that the ruined amphitheatre was actually the remains of King Arthur’s Round Table.

Today it is the most complete Roman amphitheatre in Britain.