Old Rauma is the largest unified historical wooden town in the Nordic countries. Fire has destroyed it several times since 1500s, last major one occured in 1682. There are 600 buildings in old town, mostly privately owned. Oldest still existing houses are from the 18th century.

Locations of special interest include the Kirsti house, which is a seaman's house from the 18th and 19th centuries, and the Marela house, which is a shipowner's house dating to the 18th century but with a 19th century facade, both of which are currently museums. The population of Old Rauma is 800. the Church of the Holy Cross, an old Franciscan monastery church from the 15th century with medieval paintings and the old town hall from 1776.

In 1991 Old Rauma was inscribed on the UNESCO World Heritage list.

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Details

Founded: 18th century
Category: Historic city squares, old towns and villages in Finland
Historical period: The Age of Enlightenment (Finland)

Rating

4.4/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

luke_power (2 years ago)
Pretty place to See, really unique
DarkShadow (2 years ago)
Beautiful building s and interesting shops.
Willem van Zantvoort (2 years ago)
Definitely worth to visit. Nice old town atmosphere. A lot of small shops. Nice musea and a beautiful old church.
D H (2 years ago)
Lovely old town with lots of fantastic old wooden buildings, barns and yards, and an interesting old church. Plenty to see, plenty of bars and eateries. Lace festival week they open up a lot of yards for you to browse and buy the occupants old junk from the flea stalls if you are so inclined. There is a big campsite down by the sea for tents, caravans and mobile homes and it is in walking or biking distance of the historic old town.
Iida Virtanen (2 years ago)
Beautiful place and lot of lovely shops with amazing artwork and handicrafts
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