St. Bridget Church

Magor, United Kingdom

The church of St. Bridget or Brigid is set in quiet countryside, adjoining the site of a deserted medieval village. It was traditionally founded by Brochwael, the son of Meurig of Gwent, in the 10th century. The church tower dates from the 13th or 14th century, but the body of the church was rebuilt in the 19th century after it became dilapidated.

Aside from today's farmhouses outlying the clustered centre, St. Brides Netherwent was abandoned in the 18th century.

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Founded: 13th century
Category: Religious sites in United Kingdom

More Information

en.wikipedia.org

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4.7/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

David Nurse (4 months ago)
A lovely place to visit if you are in the area. Look out for the chest tomb of John Morgan, who died in 1557, who was a Member of Parliament for the Monmouth Boroughs, Steward of the Duchy of Lancaster and also a lectern that was commissioned in 1909 and is by the Arts and Crafts designer, George Jack, and incorporates a figure of St Bridget. There is parking here (51.87809680428079, -2.790591909573205) for a a dozen cars or so and the place is easy to visit. Off the B4347 from Monmouth and on to the B4521 takes you to Skenfrith. There are no facilities at the site. The site is popular in the summer months with locals sunbathing and swimming in the river close to Skenfrith castle..
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