Knights Street

Rhodes, Greece

The street of the Knights (Odós Ippotón) is one of the highlights of the Medieval Town of Rhodes. It is a fascinating and obligatory visit for all guided tours, one of the most admired attractions in the Old Town.

Following an almost exact east to west direction, the well preserved cobble paved street uses, in part, an ancient straight road that connected the port with the Acropolis of Rhodos. The medieval road is about 600m long. Starts from the square in front of the Knights’ Hospital, the seat of Archeological Museum and leads to the Grand Master’s Palace.

Along the street seven imposing inns where constructed in the early 16th century, representing the seven countries, or tongues, that the Knights of the Order of St John were originated from. Each facade is decorated with emblems and details that reflect the respective country. With no doubt, the finest of them is the Auberge de France that was built between 1492 and 1503. Most of the Grand Masters were French so their influence on the architecture was considerable. Stonemasons and craftsmen were for the most part Greek but workers from France and Spain were also brought here.

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    Address

    Ippoton 1-9, Rhodes, Greece
    See all sites in Rhodes

    Details

    Founded: 14th century
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    rhodos.gr

    Rating

    4.7/5 (based on Google user reviews)

    User Reviews

    Klio Ish (4 months ago)
    Ancient pebbled street. Great view and atmosphere. Worth visiting
    Nicklas Møller Jepsen (5 months ago)
    Close your eyes and imaging how this street was 1000 years ago! Also, great challenge to run all the way up there!
    Ross Malickis (14 months ago)
    Lovely street to walk on with great architecture and museums.
    Zoe Muncey (14 months ago)
    Amazing street to feel you have spepped back in time
    Malcolm Lashbrook (14 months ago)
    Looked very nice, just felt I was too old, and it was too hot to walk up it.
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