Ancient Theatre of Lindos

Lindos, Greece

The ancient theatre of Lindos lies at the foot of the west slope of the rock of the Lindos acropolis. It had 19 rows of seats, most of them carved into the rock although somewere built, as were the endmost cunei and the side retaining walls, which  do  not survive. Today only the rock-carved sections are preserved: the circular orchestra, the three central cunei of the lower cavea and parts of the two neighbouring ones, and the central section of the upper cavea.  The orchestra of the theatre is circular, also carved into the rock.

The theatre is dated to the 4th century BCE and had a capacity of 1,800-2,000 spectators. It is connected to the great city festivals in honour of Dionysos, the Sminthia, which included theatrical, musical and athletic competitions, processions and sacrifices. In the 3rd century BCE, directly adjacent to the theatre was built the Tetrastoon, a rectangular building with an internal colonnade, perhaps a sanctuary of Dionysos Smintheus.

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Lindos, Greece
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Details

Founded: 4th century BCE
Category: Religious sites in Greece

More Information

www.diazoma.gr

Rating

4.3/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Aneta Jones (10 months ago)
Not as impressive as expected, but easy to see and still decently preserved. The site is behind a parking lot blocked by fence, you can just stop by while looking around the town or on the way to the bay or just enjoy it from the distance.
Stacy Denley (13 months ago)
Beautiful views worth visiting. A little pricey but enjoyed the experience. Need good walking legs.
Rachel Jones (14 months ago)
Absolutely beautiful place, if your in lindos, try and visit. 12 euro to get in, but worth the views and to see the acropolis. Steep incline to walk, cafe and toilet at top, cafe quite expensive.
Ross (14 months ago)
Beautiful piece of history, and the views from on top of the Acropolis are stunning. It's the ruins of a steep seating area of an ampitheater from the 4th century BC, linked to pagan festivals of the time. The ancient theatre of Lindos lies at the foot of the west slope of the rock of the Lindos acropolis. The cavea was divided into nine cunei separated by eight narrow staircases. It had 19 rows of seats, most of them carved into the rock although somewere built, as were the endmost cunei and the side retaining walls, which do not survive. The upper cavea is more steeply inclined in order to provide even the non-privileged spectators with a good view. The upper edge of the cavea is also delimited by a vertically-carved rock face, 2.70 m high. A rocky projection corresponding to the centre of the cunei may have served as the base of a choregic monument. Today, only the rock-carved sections are preserved: the circular orchestra, the three central cunei of the lower cavea and parts of the two neighbouring ones, and the central section of the upper cavea. The orchestra of the theatre is circular, also carved into the rock. Around it runs as lightly raised border, 50 cm wide, probably intended to prevent rainwater flooding the orchestra as there was no drainage duct. The seats of honour, or thrones, were arranged in a circle on a 1.60-metre-wide projecting band of rock, which was completed with stones. The site of the stage building was established from the traces of its foundation course in the rock. The stage was at least 19 m long and 4.80 m wide. The theatre of Lindos is dated to the 4th c. BC had a capacity of 1,800-2,000 spectators. It is connected to the great city festivals in honour of Dionysos, the Sminthia, which included theatrical, musical, and athletic competitions, processions, and sacrifices. In the 3rd c. BC, directly adjacent to the theatre, was built the Tetrastoon, a rectangular building with an internal colonnade, perhaps a sanctuary of Dionysos Smintheus.
Stephen Rubenstein (2 years ago)
Impressive ruins from the 4th century BC theatre of Lindos set at the base of the Acropolis. It's not accessible and you can only see it though a fence. Still worth seeking out and viewing. Back in the day it seated as much as 1500 people. Note, despite some of the reviews suggesting otherwise, it's not part of the Acropolis and there is no cover charge. There is a small information board with details about the history.
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