Marsvinsholm Castle

Ystad, Sweden

The Marsvinsholm estate was spoken about as Bosöe, Borsöe and Bordsyö in the beginning of the 12th century. By the middle of the 14th century it was owned by members of Ulfeld family. The possession were transferred to Otto Marsvin around 1630, who built the castle 1644-1648 and renamed it after himself. The name is derived from an Old Norse word for porpoise. The castle was in the beginning built on poles in a small lake. It forms a square in 4 floors and the northeast and southwest corners are provided with towers in five floors. 1782-1786 count Erik Ruuth made a thorough renovation. 1856-1857 baron Jules Sjöblad restored the castle.

Through succession and sales the castle has belonged to the families Thott, von Königsmarck, de la Gardie, Sjöblad, Ruuth, Piper, Tornerhielm and Wachtmeister. Count Carl Wachtmeister sold the castle and the remaining land to arl Jules Stjernblad in 1854. The castle was handed down to his daughter, the duchess Ida Eherensvärd. Her children, Rutger, Louise and Madeleine Bennet owned it until 1910 when it was sold to dame Johannes Jahennesen. 1938 it was handed down to his daughter, Anna Margrethe and her husband Iörgen Wedelboe-Larsen. Their son sold 1978 to Bengt Iacobaeus. His son Mr Tomas Iacobaeus is the current owner of Marsvineholm.

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Details

Founded: 1644-1648
Category: Castles and fortifications in Sweden
Historical period: Swedish Empire (Sweden)

Rating

3.8/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Birgitta Persson (4 years ago)
För liten plats. Trångt. Varmt och klibbigt i kaféet.
Josh Whipple (4 years ago)
Beautiful site, sad we couldn't get closer, but the orchard was fantastic
Jatin Ashra (4 years ago)
Nice place... We had lunch there and a good walk around... Lovely place
Travel to (5 years ago)
This is beautiful place but plate ,,do not enter,, is sorrow.
Anton Ekström (6 years ago)
You cannot enter or go close to the castle, the whole place smelled sewer. Nothing much to see aside from the castle. The castle is very nice though, I got some really nice photos of it.
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