Ystad Abbey was inaugurated in 1267 by the Fransiscan Order. Along Vadstena it is the best preserved medieval abbey in Sweden. Dissolved at the Reformation, the Abbey was handed over to the towns people and soon fell into disrepair. The eastern part and gatekeeper’s house has survived to present days.. In 1912 it became home to the local museum, which holds changing temporary exhibitions in a wing of the abbey and the old abbey church. There is a lovely rose and herb garden in the grounds and also a cafe and shop.

The gothic style abbey church, dedicated to St. Peter, is today a parish church. It was built in the 14th century.

References:
  • Marianne Mehling et al. Knaurs Kulturführer in Farbe. Schweden. München 1987.

Comments

Your name

Website (optional)



Address

Klostergatan 10, Ystad, Sweden
See all sites in Ystad

Details

Founded: 1267
Category: Religious sites in Sweden
Historical period: Consolidation (Sweden)

More Information

content.skane.com

Rating

4.3/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Jonas Söderström (6 months ago)
I've been to the Gray Friars Monastery several times over the last few years. It's a beautiful piece of medieval architecture and love coming back. There is an museum in part of the Monastery which has different exhibits. Check out the ducks and duckpond outside the Monastery, they are lovely.
Marcela Troncoso (11 months ago)
Lovely environments. Not only the cloister, church and museum, but the garden around. Try to visit it when the roses garden is full of flowers and take some minutes to walk those geometrically planned paths that brings you to the small fountain in the centre. Then take your time by the vegetables garden and the herbs garden. It said that monks started the gardens more than 500 years ago. Close by the cloister relax for a while with the view of an artificial huge pond, meantime you discover the many species of ducks and acuatic birds that live there. Many different seasonal flowers make the experience complete
Anders Weinberg (12 months ago)
The pride of Ystad. Well worth a visit.
Giorgio Berardi (15 months ago)
The abbey is Ystad is lovely and well preserved, with various aspects of monastic life highlighted throughout the history of the city. A very interesting way for spending an hour or two, especially on a grey day.
Cyprian Czop (16 months ago)
A museum at the site of the former Franciscan convent and church, built 750 years ago.
Powered by Google

Featured Historic Landmarks, Sites & Buildings

Historic Site of the week

Jelling Runestones

The Jelling stones are massive carved runestones from the 10th century, found at the town of Jelling in Denmark. The older of the two Jelling stones was raised by King Gorm the Old in memory of his wife Thyra. The larger of the two stones was raised by King Gorm's son, Harald Bluetooth in memory of his parents, celebrating his conquest of Denmark and Norway, and his conversion of the Danes to Christianity. The runic inscriptions on these stones are considered the most well known in Denmark.

The Jelling stones stand in the churchyard of Jelling church between two large mounds. The stones represent the transitional period between the indigenous Norse paganism and the process of Christianization in Denmark; the larger stone is often cited as Denmark's baptismal certificate (dåbsattest), containing a depiction of Christ. They are strongly identified with the creation of Denmark as a nation state and both stones feature one of the earliest records of the name 'Danmark'.

After having been exposed to all kinds of weather for a thousand years cracks are beginning to show. On the 15th of November 2008 experts from UNESCO examined the stones to determine their condition. Experts requested that the stones be moved to an indoor exhibition hall, or in some other way protected in situ, to prevent further damage from the weather.

Heritage Agency of Denmark decided to keep the stones in their current location and selected a protective casing design from 157 projects submitted through a competition. The winner of the competition was Nobel Architects. The glass casing creates a climate system that keeps the stones at a fixed temperature and humidity and protects them from weathering. The design features rectangular glass casings strengthened by two solid bronze sides mounted on a supporting steel skeleton. The glass is coated with an anti-reflective material that gives the exhibit a greenish hue. Additionally, the bronze patina gives off a rusty, greenish colour, highlighting the runestones' gray and reddish tones and emphasising their monumental character and significance.