Ystad Abbey was inaugurated in 1267 by the Fransiscan Order. Along Vadstena it is the best preserved medieval abbey in Sweden. Dissolved at the Reformation, the Abbey was handed over to the towns people and soon fell into disrepair. The eastern part and gatekeeper’s house has survived to present days.. In 1912 it became home to the local museum, which holds changing temporary exhibitions in a wing of the abbey and the old abbey church. There is a lovely rose and herb garden in the grounds and also a cafe and shop.

The gothic style abbey church, dedicated to St. Peter, is today a parish church. It was built in the 14th century.

References:
  • Marianne Mehling et al. Knaurs Kulturführer in Farbe. Schweden. München 1987.

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Address

Klostergatan 10, Ystad, Sweden
See all sites in Ystad

Details

Founded: 1267
Category: Religious sites in Sweden
Historical period: Consolidation (Sweden)

More Information

content.skane.com

Rating

4.3/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Stellio T (6 months ago)
Beautiful spot in Ystad, with a small but lovely garden.
Kaarel Kukk (2 years ago)
A Very interesting and exciting place. Beautiful garden.
Patrik Hammar (2 years ago)
A beautiful abbey, originally built in the 13th century, but extensively remodelled since then. Unfortunately, only two ranges of the original building remain. In their place, gorgeous gardens have been (re-)planted, including a rose garden and a herb garden. Well worth a visit when you're in beautiful Ystad.
Stephanie Alvarez Fernandez (2 years ago)
Such a nice place for sitting or walking around. Nearby there is a coffee place and a pretty cozy garden where you can enjoy the view and relax.
Wolfgang Kirschstein (2 years ago)
Small museum in the Abbey. Changing exhibitions. Sufficient information about the Abbey. Worth a visit.
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