Ystad Abbey was inaugurated in 1267 by the Fransiscan Order. Along Vadstena it is the best preserved medieval abbey in Sweden. Dissolved at the Reformation, the Abbey was handed over to the towns people and soon fell into disrepair. The eastern part and gatekeeper’s house has survived to present days.. In 1912 it became home to the local museum, which holds changing temporary exhibitions in a wing of the abbey and the old abbey church. There is a lovely rose and herb garden in the grounds and also a cafe and shop.

The gothic style abbey church, dedicated to St. Peter, is today a parish church. It was built in the 14th century.

References:
  • Marianne Mehling et al. Knaurs Kulturführer in Farbe. Schweden. München 1987.

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Address

Klostergatan 10, Ystad, Sweden
See all sites in Ystad

Details

Founded: 1267
Category: Religious sites in Sweden
Historical period: Consolidation (Sweden)

More Information

content.skane.com

Rating

4.3/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

William Josefsson (15 months ago)
basic call
Byou Tekina (17 months ago)
First floor had an exhibition for children but the second floor had some history about the restoration. Nearby grounds are very pretty in summertime.
Aleksandr Filippenko (2 years ago)
Nothing really special, but nice with sweet park, little rosarium and pound with ducks. Good museum.
Horn “Hornhaut” Haut (2 years ago)
Haven't been in it but the herbal garden is nice to sit in. The buildings look interesting. There is a little lake with ducks next to it. Most duck species breed once a year, choosing to do so in favourable conditions (spring/summer or wet seasons). Ducks also tend to make a nest before breeding, and, after hatching, lead their ducklings to water. Interesting isn't it?
Barbara Mitchell (2 years ago)
A very quick visit close to closing time. Impression of great calm and some evocative photographs. Also watching gulls and crows at the duck pond was brilliant.
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