Ystad Abbey was inaugurated in 1267 by the Fransiscan Order. Along Vadstena it is the best preserved medieval abbey in Sweden. Dissolved at the Reformation, the Abbey was handed over to the towns people and soon fell into disrepair. The eastern part and gatekeeper’s house has survived to present days.. In 1912 it became home to the local museum, which holds changing temporary exhibitions in a wing of the abbey and the old abbey church. There is a lovely rose and herb garden in the grounds and also a cafe and shop.

The gothic style abbey church, dedicated to St. Peter, is today a parish church. It was built in the 14th century.

References:
  • Marianne Mehling et al. Knaurs Kulturführer in Farbe. Schweden. München 1987.

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Address

Klostergatan 10, Ystad, Sweden
See all sites in Ystad

Details

Founded: 1267
Category: Religious sites in Sweden
Historical period: Consolidation (Sweden)

More Information

content.skane.com

Rating

4.3/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Jonas Söderström (43 days ago)
I've been to the Gray Friars Monastery several times over the last few years. It's a beautiful piece of medieval architecture and love coming back. There is an museum in part of the Monastery which has different exhibits. Check out the ducks and duckpond outside the Monastery, they are lovely.
Marcela Troncoso (6 months ago)
Lovely environments. Not only the cloister, church and museum, but the garden around. Try to visit it when the roses garden is full of flowers and take some minutes to walk those geometrically planned paths that brings you to the small fountain in the centre. Then take your time by the vegetables garden and the herbs garden. It said that monks started the gardens more than 500 years ago. Close by the cloister relax for a while with the view of an artificial huge pond, meantime you discover the many species of ducks and acuatic birds that live there. Many different seasonal flowers make the experience complete
Anders Weinberg (7 months ago)
The pride of Ystad. Well worth a visit.
Giorgio Berardi (10 months ago)
The abbey is Ystad is lovely and well preserved, with various aspects of monastic life highlighted throughout the history of the city. A very interesting way for spending an hour or two, especially on a grey day.
Cyprian Czop (11 months ago)
A museum at the site of the former Franciscan convent and church, built 750 years ago.
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