Häckeberga Castle

Genarp, Sweden

There has been a stronghold in Häckeberga since 1530s. It wa demolished in the 19th century and the current Häckeberga Castle was built in 1873-1875 by Tönnes Wrangel von Brehmer. Helgo Zettervall's architecture represents neo-renaissance style with French details. Today there is an countryside hotel and fine restaurant.

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Address

790, Genarp, Sweden
See all sites in Genarp

Details

Founded: 1873-1875
Category: Palaces, manors and town halls in Sweden
Historical period: Union with Norway and Modernization (Sweden)

Rating

4.2/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Hubertus Tummescheit (8 months ago)
Great food, and beautiful landscape around.
david stuart (10 months ago)
Very nice location. The food was decent. Was a bit annoying that they only had one room key per room but it still worked ok. They had free wifi.
Peter Fuesz (18 months ago)
Wonderful castle with great surroundings.
Sonya Downs (2 years ago)
Nice place for conferences keeping the team together. Cons: no place to go beside here without a taxi or car.
Patrik Madsen (2 years ago)
Fantastic walking! Take a stroll anticlockwise around the lake. Make sure to walk thru the forrest, keep left all the way, springtime is the best.
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