Located in the historic centre of the city, the former Bank of Portugal building has housed the Costume Museum since 2004. Here you can appreciate the ethnographic wealth of the traditional costumes of Viana. The exhibits also include the tools used to produce the handmade garments, alongside the permanent exhibitions A lã e o linho no traje do Alto Minho (Wool and linen in Alto Minho garments), Traje à Vianesa (Viana’s traditional dress) and Oficina do Ouro (Gold Workshop).

The Costume Museum organises a great many temporary exhibitions on the theme of Viana’s traditional dress and ethnography.

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Details

Founded: 2004
Category: Museums in Portugal

More Information

www.visitportugal.com

Rating

4.5/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Silvia Ninova (13 months ago)
Amazing museum for all age. My kids love it. It has all kinds of clothes topical for Portugal. You can see colourful traditional clothes during the years. There are unique exsebition from golden jewelleries. Interactive board for the kids and different tools, helping to melted and proceeded the whole process. The ticket cost 2 EUR and give permission to visit one more museum. It's not free during the weekend, although is written. Enjoy it
Clara Correia (2 years ago)
Interesting bits of history and culture here. Many costumes and professions to be seen and discovered. There are two levels and a tiny gold museum too.
Lidia Aroucha Dos Santos (2 years ago)
It was an amazing experience. The museo tells the history of traditional clothe that people used in the past at the Minho Region. It tells the story behind the colors, the embroidery, why they used in some occasions. Seeing the beauty of each piece and how was made step by step. Great job! It's free you don't pay to enter. Next time in Viana do Castelo take time to see that place.
L D (2 years ago)
It was an amazing experience. The museo tells the history of traditional clothe that people used in the past at the Minho Region. It tells the story behind the colors, the embroidery, why they used in some occasions. Seeing the beauty of each piece and how was made step by step. Great job! It's free you don't pay to enter. Next time in Viana do Castelo take time to see that place.
Patrick Denby (2 years ago)
Never conceived that thisight be interesting... Well laid out, interesting translations.
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