Sanctuary of Bom Jesus do Monte

Braga, Portugal

The Sanctuary of Bom Jesus do Monte is a Portuguese Catholic shrine in Tenões, outside the city of Braga. Its name means Good Jesus of the Mount. It is a notable example of Christian pilgrimage site with a monumental, Baroque stairway that climbs 116 meters. It is an important tourist attraction of Braga and in 2019 inscribed as a UNESCO World Heritage Site.

Many hilltops in Portugal and other parts of Europe have been sites of religious devotion since antiquity, and it is possible that the Bom Jesus hill was one of these. However, the first indication of a chapel over the hill dates from 1373. This chapel - dedicated to the Holy Cross - was rebuilt in the 15th and 16th centuries. In 1629 a pilgrimage church was built dedicated to the Bom Jesus (Good Jesus), with six chapels dedicated to the Passion of Christ.

The present Sanctuary started being built in 1722, under the patronage of the Archbishop of Braga, Rodrigo de Moura Telles. His coat of arms is seen over the gateway, in the beginning of the stairway. Under his direction the first stairway row, with chapels dedicated to the Via Crucis, were completed. Each chapel is decorated with terra cotta sculptures depicting the Passion of Christ. He also sponsored the next segment of stairways, which has a zigzag shape and is dedicated to the Five Senses. Each sense (Sight, Smell, Hearing, Touch, Taste) is represented by a different fountain. At the end of this stairway, a Baroque church was built around 1725 by architect Manuel Pinto Vilalobos.

The works on the first chapels, stairways and church proceeded through the 18th century. In an area behind the church (the Terreiro dos Evangelistas), three octagonal chapels were built in the 1760s with statues depicting episodes that occur after the Crucifixion, like the meeting of Jesus with Mary Magdalene. The exterior design of the beautiful chapels is attributed to renowned Braga architect André Soares. Around these chapels there are four Baroque fountains with statues of the Evangelists, also dating from the 1760s.

Around 1781, archbishop Gaspar de Bragança decided to complete the ensemble by adding a third segment of stairways and a new church. The third stairway also follows a zigzag pattern and is dedicated to the Three Theological Virtues: Faith, Hope and Charity, each with its fountain. The old church was demolished and a new one was built following a Neoclassic design by architect Carlos Amarante. This new church, began in 1784, had its interior decorated in the beginning of the 19th century and was consecrated in 1834. The main altarpiece is dedicated to the Crucifixion.

In the 19th century, the area around the church and stairway was expropriated and turned into a park. In 1882, to facilitate the access to the Sanctuary, the water balance Bom Jesus funicular was built linking the city of Braga to the hill. This was the first funicular to be built in the Iberian Peninsula and is still in use.

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Details

Founded: 1722
Category: Religious sites in Portugal

Rating

4.8/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Jakub Sztuba (11 months ago)
Beautiful place! I was really amazed that it's free to visit, as it offers a lot to see. You can spend half of the day here and not get bored. Great for photos, relax or intensive visiting.
Sander Hoogendoorn (12 months ago)
Nice place with famous staircase. From bottom to top over 500 steps. There's an elevator too, but climbing the staircase is the largest part of the "fun". Although it makes sense to start at the bottom entrance, you can also start at the top. There's a nice park, and free parking.
Nina Danaja Lamovec (13 months ago)
Absolutely beautiful looks like a wedding venue. Loads of places to take pictures of yourself. There's also a public bathroom so you don't have to look for it too much although there is no toilet paper. The views are spectacular.
Andriy Troyan (13 months ago)
A Nice place to spend some time together or by yourself. It has some interesting fountains and if you are lazy a funicular to make it faster. A nice view of the city, a wonderful rock structure and an amazing staircase structure. Overall it is definitely a place to see !
Anders Svensson (2 years ago)
Wonderful are around the Church! The stairs includes 14 stops with Bible verses to meditate over. Nice view over the surrounding landscape. No entrance fee to the Church (2020-07-18). Exceptional altar in the Church.
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