Tui Cathedral

Tui, Spain

Construction of the Tui Cathedral began in 1120, but it was not consecrated until 1225 under the reign of Alfonso IX. It looks like a fortress because of its crenellated towers. Its structure is clearly Romanesque and later diverse decorative Gothic elements were added. From the Romanesque period there are the capitals that top the interior columns, and from the Gothic period there is the portico of the main entrance.

The main chapel located in the choir was completed in 1699 by Castro Canseco. The interior has a large prominent retablo de la Expectacion, and a large altar of relics in the Chapel of the Relics.

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Address

Plaza San Fernando s/n, Tui, Spain
See all sites in Tui

Details

Founded: 1120-1225
Category: Religious sites in Spain

Rating

4.5/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Fickle Fancy Free (3 months ago)
I passed by and got my first pilgrim stamp in Spain. The stamp doesn’t cost anything, entrance fee is €4, I think it might be less for a pilgrim, I didn’t look around so I’m not sure. The outside is beautiful, wish my feet were ok enough for me to walk around, but then again I can always come back!
Kati Khartsí (4 months ago)
Beautiful place. Have done the peregrine passport in 2 min and 2€/each.
Mark Arndt (6 months ago)
I thought the price to visit was a bit high. This is an interesting venue but not particularly special.
zia uddin (2 years ago)
Awesome
Ve Rena (2 years ago)
Don't miss out on the garden. If the door is closed (glass, right side of the cathedral, in the back) ask for it to be opened: From there you have a fantastic view over Valença.
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