Château de la Bourdaisière

Montlouis-sur-Loire, France

Château de la Bourdaisière origins date back to the 14th century when it was a fortress belonging to Jean Meingre. Over the next few generations, the property changed hands several time, until 1520 when King Francis I arranged for construction of a new castle on the site. Built for his mistress, Marie Gaudin, the wife of Philibert Babou, Superintendent of Finances for France, after her death, the property would remain in the family's hands. Marie Gaudin's granddaughter, Gabrielle d'Estrées, was born in the château and would herself grow up to become mistress to another king, Henry IV of France.

In 1775, the château was partially destroyed by order of King Louis XV's most powerful Minister, Étienne François, Duc de Choiseul. Étienne François wanted to use the stones from Château de la Bourdaisière for the construction of his Pagoda at his estate in Chanteloup, near Amboise.

Lying in ruins, in 1786 the land was sold to Louise Adélaïde of Penthièvre Bourbon. In 1802 the property was acquired by Baron Joseph Angelier who undertook a massive reconstruction of Château Bourdaisière. The interior work would be completed by his son, Gustave Angelier. Although a small château, when compared to the great châteaux of the Kings and some of those built by other wealthy nobles, it is a magnificent Renaissance construction fronted by traditional French gardens.

During World War II, the château was occupied by the Nazis. After the war, a lack of funds by its owner saw it become severely run down. In 1959, its contents were auctioned off and government turned the château into a home for the elderly.

In 2003, Château de la Bourdaisière gained considerable attention in North America, as the primary site for the television show Joe Millionaire. In 2011, the chateaus gardens were finalist for the European Garden Award bestowed by the European Garden Heritage Network. The château was listed as a monument historique in 1947. Today it functions as a hotel.

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Founded: 1520
Category: Castles and fortifications in France

Rating

4.2/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Reynaldo Bustamante (3 years ago)
Very nice and quite place with easy access by car. We enjoyed very much this huge open space.
Todd Homan (3 years ago)
The Chateau is great. Food was okay in the restaurant. They seemed to be mailing it in a bit in the restaurant. After seeing the lovely vegetable garden full of tomatoes and squash I sort of expected better.
Neo103 INSIDR (3 years ago)
Even though a very old Chateaux, some of the amenities...towels, bedding...could be more modern. Very friendly, helpful staff makes sure your every need is handled.
Connie Pittman (3 years ago)
I have never stayed in a Castle or Chateau before so this was a first. I was not disappointed. Nothing can compare to the experience. It was breathtaking. The grounds were covered with well manicured flower gardens and vegetable and fruit gardens. It was truly like a fairytale experience. Staff were so kind and accommodating. I will go back.
Gites de La Richardière (3 years ago)
Excellent location. Great walks in the parklands. Lovely Chateau. The home of Tomatoes! Try their tomato beer...mmm...interesting.
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