Château de Candé

Monts, France

The first known Lord and owner of Château de Candé was Macé de Larçay, in 1313. François Briçonnet, the mayor of Tours and state treasurer, purchased the fief in 1499 and built a Renaissance house on the site of the old fortress. He died before the building was finished, and it was completed by his daughter, Jeanne, in 1508.

Several owners succeeded to the estate, but none brought major transformations to the castle. In 1853, Santiago Drake del Castillo, heir of a wealthy plantation owner, acquired the castle. At this time the northern wing was added, in the neo-gothic style; this tripled the living space.

In 1927, Charles Bedaux, a Franco-American industrial millionaire, and his wife Fern, repurchased the castle with Jean Drake del Castillo, the grandson of Santiago. They carried out substantial work to modernise the castle, such as adding a plumbing system, improving the electrical system and installing central heating in all parts of the building, with 60 tons of pipes installed in the walls. The eight bedrooms are each equipped with a bathroom in the art déco style; all have baths equipped with an American system, making it possible to fill and empty a bathtub in less than one minute. Indoor toilets were also added. Bedaux installed a telephone, which at the time was unique in a French residence; it was directly connected to the exchange in Tours, and therefore required an operator to be present in the castle. A golf course with 18 holes, a tennis court, a gymnasium and a solarium were also built at this time. 

In 1937, the marriage of the Duke of Windsor (formerly King Edward VIII), and Wallis Warfield Simpson took place here. Cecil Beaton took their wedding photos here as well. On the death of Fern Bedaux in 1972, the castle was bequeathed to the State, which reassigned it to the council of Indre-et-Loire in 1974.

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Founded: 1499-1508
Category: Castles and fortifications in France

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4.6/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Katarina Ka (3 years ago)
The best!! Better than chambord or chenonceau! beautiful exposition, super clean, wonderful Garden, helpful staff (who actually speaks english!) not crowded,totally must see!
Marcus whibley (4 years ago)
Nice gardens to walk around
Marcus whibley (4 years ago)
Nice gardens to walk around
Gites de La Richardière (4 years ago)
What a completely charming place. Beautiful house with huge connections to British Royalty and lovely walks where visitors can see some very interesting sculptures. We're going back!
Mark Playle (4 years ago)
One of the best places we have visited. Well run with knowledgeable staff.
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