Château de Loches

Loches, France

The Château de Loches was constructed in the 9th century. Built some 500 metres above the Indre River, the huge castle, famous mostly for its massive square keep, dominates the town of Loches. Designed and occupied by Henry II of England and his son, Richard the Lionheart during the 12th century, the castle withstood the assaults by the French king Philip II in their wars for control of France until it was finally captured by Philip in 1204.

Construction work immediately upgraded Loches into a huge military fortress. The castle would become a favorite residence of Charles VII of France who gave it to his mistress, Agnès Sorel, as her residence. It would be converted for use as a State prison by his son, King Louis XI who had lived there as a child but preferred the royal castle at Amboise.

During the American Revolution, France financed and fought with the Americans against England and King Louis XVI used the castle of Loches as a prison for captured Englishmen. At the time of the French Revolution, the château was ransacked and severely damaged. Some major restoration began in 1806 but today there are parts visible as ruins only. Owned by the Commune of Loches, the castle and the adjacent ancient Church of Saint-Ours are open to the public.

Château de Loches has been recognised as a monument historique since 1861 and is listed by the French Ministry of Culture.

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Details

Founded: 13th century
Category: Castles and fortifications in France
Historical period: Late Capetians (France)

Rating

4.3/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Andrew Burnett (11 months ago)
Very good chateau to visit in a lovely town
Bea Bouton (11 months ago)
Very interesting. The price of the ticket was very reasonable and Loches is a beautiful little town typical of the Touraine, with a lot of character.
Raymond Beresford (13 months ago)
Fantastic area well worth a visit ...so much history
Michael Gough (15 months ago)
Not only is the Château well worth a visit for its historical interest but it's also worthwhile having a wander around Loches as well. It's a very pleasant place to visit, the Château being an added bonus. One can not help wonder however as to how much power and wealth the original owners had to create such magnificent buildings. Well worth a visit.
Adam Roden (16 months ago)
Amazing site to see! You can go to the top of the dungeon! It’s great!
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