Château de Montpoupon

Céré-la-Ronde, France

The Château de Montpoupon is named after a Germanic tribe, the Poppo, who settled here on the rocky promontory at the time of Charlemagne. The site thus came to be known as Mons Poppo (the hill of the Poppos).With the passage of time this evolved into Montpoupon. 

At the end of the Middle Ages, the château passed into the hands of the Lords de Prie et de Buzançais, a family who were to leave their mark. In 1460, Antoine de Prie and his wife, Madeleine d’Amboise restored the château which had been left in poor condition at the end of the Hundred Years War.

In 1763 the Marquis de Tristan, Mayor of Orléans acquired the property. The Marquis turned his hand to restoring the château to a semblance of its former glory. However, his initiative was curtailed by the onset of the Revolution; fortunately despite the terror of the time, only the chapel was destroyed and the château remained intact. In 1840 the château underwent further transformation at the hands of its new owner, M. de Farville with the construction of the present outbuildings.

Finally, in 1857, Jean Baptiste de la Motte Saint Pierre acquired the estate. At the turn of the century the family began the work which was to restore the château to the Renaissance appearance it has to-day. In memory of his family, the present owner, the Count of Louvencourt, nephew of the above, has set up the magnificent Musée du veneur (Hunting Museum) in the outbuildings.

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Details

Founded: 1460
Category: Castles and fortifications in France

Rating

4.4/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Paul Ross (13 months ago)
Provides a wonderful Vista on the D764 out of Genille. If you like field sports, hunting in particular this is the place for you.
Andrew Showler (13 months ago)
What a great place to visit, very interesting, well presented and most helpful ,English translations of all the information sheets. Good, free parking only 70 metres from the front gate. Clean toilets inside the chateau complex. Vending machine for drinks. We'll worth a visit if you're in the area. €8.50 for Adults.
Jackie Burbridge (15 months ago)
If you're into hunting or shooting etc it's absolutely fascinating. Worth 2nd visit.
Hai Say Ung (15 months ago)
Not feeling welcomed by the people who live there. Small little chateau with nothing exceptional
Karosel Equestrian (20 months ago)
Lovely venue. Loved the horses and hounds. What a spectacle!
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