Mustio manor ("Mustio Castle", "Svartå Slott") was built in 1783-1792 by Magnus Linder, the owner of the local ironworks. There had been an older manor from the 17th century, but it was dismantled when the present one was built. The manor represents the neoclassical ("kustavilainen") architecture.

Today Mustio is a countryside hotel. There are also the old ironworks and one of the biggest private historical parks of Finland.

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Details

Founded: 1783-1792
Category: Palaces, manors and town halls in Finland
Historical period: The Age of Enlightenment (Finland)

Rating

4.3/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Heidi Komulainen (2 years ago)
A positive suprise. It was so beautiful. A bit expensive coffee tough and only got it from the restaurant.
VAIBHAV LOLGE (2 years ago)
This is a very good and relaxing place. The spot is excellent. Just besides a very beautiful lake. The food is really awesome. The home made bread is out of this world. The rooms are huge and clean. All in all a great experience. The only problem is getting there. You cannot go to the place unless you have or hire a car.
GoZa MiTe (2 years ago)
This is big and beautiful manor with very nice garden around it. You can walk around area quite freely.
mika suihkonen (2 years ago)
Exiting discovery for weekend getaway. Large forest area with lakes, parks and old buildings. Great restaurant and breakfast. Rooms are nice and old looking, but clean. Overall experience is peaceful and relaxing. One of the best hotels in Finland so far.
Camilla Höglund (2 years ago)
Amazing food, friendly staff, absolutely beautiful surroundings. The rooms are beautiful, clean and decorated with style. Overall the perfect relaxing gettaway!
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