Mustio manor ("Mustio Castle", "Svartå Slott") was built in 1783-1792 by Magnus Linder, the owner of the local ironworks. There had been an older manor from the 17th century, but it was dismantled when the present one was built. The manor represents the neoclassical ("kustavilainen") architecture.

Today Mustio is a countryside hotel. There are also the old ironworks and one of the biggest private historical parks of Finland.

Comments

Your name

Website (optional)



Details

Founded: 1783-1792
Category: Palaces, manors and town halls in Finland
Historical period: The Age of Enlightenment (Finland)

Rating

4.3/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Heidi Komulainen (7 months ago)
A positive suprise. It was so beautiful. A bit expensive coffee tough and only got it from the restaurant.
VAIBHAV LOLGE (8 months ago)
This is a very good and relaxing place. The spot is excellent. Just besides a very beautiful lake. The food is really awesome. The home made bread is out of this world. The rooms are huge and clean. All in all a great experience. The only problem is getting there. You cannot go to the place unless you have or hire a car.
GoZa MiTe (8 months ago)
This is big and beautiful manor with very nice garden around it. You can walk around area quite freely.
mika suihkonen (9 months ago)
Exiting discovery for weekend getaway. Large forest area with lakes, parks and old buildings. Great restaurant and breakfast. Rooms are nice and old looking, but clean. Overall experience is peaceful and relaxing. One of the best hotels in Finland so far.
Camilla Höglund (10 months ago)
Amazing food, friendly staff, absolutely beautiful surroundings. The rooms are beautiful, clean and decorated with style. Overall the perfect relaxing gettaway!
Powered by Google

Featured Historic Landmarks, Sites & Buildings

Historic Site of the week

Kerameikos

Kerameikos was the potters" quarter of the city, from which the English word 'ceramic' is derived, and was also the site of an important cemetery and numerous funerary sculptures erected along the road out of the city towards Eleusis.

The earliest tombs at the Kerameikos date from the Early Bronze Age (2700-2000 BC), and the cemetery appears to have continuously expanded from the sub-Mycenaean period (1100-1000 BC). In the Geometric (1000-700 BC) and Archaic periods (700-480 BC) the number of tombs increased; they were arranged inside tumuli or marked by funerary monuments. The cemetery was used incessantly from the Hellenistic period until the Early Christian period (338 BC until approximately the sixth century AD).

The most important Athenian vases come from the tombs of the Kerameikos. Among them is the famous “Dipylon Oinochoe”, which bears the earliest inscription written in the Greek alphabet (second half of the eighth century BC). The site"s small museum houses the finds from the Kerameikos excavations.