Château de Meung-sur-Loire

Meung-sur-Loire, France

The Château de Meung-sur-Loire, located next to the collegial church, was the country residence of the Bishops of Orléans. It was built and destroyed several times. The oldest still existing parts date from the 13th century and were built by Manassès de Seignelay (bishop from 1207 to 1221). Still standing are the main rectangular plan building, flanked by three towers, a fourth having been destroyed.

During the Hundred Years' War, the building was transformed into a fortress; it was taken from the English by Joan of Arc on 14 June 1429. At the end of the 15th century and start of the 16th century, building to the north incorporated a tower with drawbridge. The castle was abandoned from the Wars of Religion until the start of the 18th century, when Bishop Fleuriau d'Armenonville undertook the transformation of the structure into a comfortable residence.The rear façade was rebuilt in the Classical style by d'Armenonville. Beneath the castle are dungeons, a chapel and various medieval torture instruments, including one used for water torture.

In the middle of the 18th century, a wing was added to the southeast with a staircase serving the upper floors of the wing. In 1784, the chapel was built in the Neoclassical style, with sculpture by Delaistre. The two pavilions in the grounds are contemporary with this chapel.

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Details

Founded: ca. 1200
Category: Castles and fortifications in France
Historical period: Late Capetians (France)

Rating

4.5/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Burcso Erika (5 months ago)
Nice castle. One of the local resident recommended to visit this place and I’m happy that we did. The castle is 800 years old, you can see how people’s use to live, what they use to wear. The most exciting part for me was the attic that was huge and also the tunnels under the castle. I don’t remember being able see tunnels under any other castles before, you could see the great job they done that it still in perfect condition. I’m sure that if you visit this castle you wont regret it.
Sven van der Velde (6 months ago)
I can't rave enough about this gem of a Chateau. Forget Chambord, Blois, Chenonceau or the ridiculously overpriced Versailles. Spend an hour or two walking through 800 years of history, brought to life by an obviously passionate and knowledgeable crew. Worth every cent of the very reasonable admittance fee.
Piet Goorden (7 months ago)
Its really something to visit. The enterior is nicely done and well versed. There are many descriptions and things to see. Also for the kids there are things to do like the dragon garden and for kids above 4 years an obsticale garden. The small animal garden was just 2 animals when we visited.
Scott Drescher (10 months ago)
Very well-presented château experience with a pretty park. We had lunch at the picnic area and listened to scores of birds. Fun for kids, too.
Matthieu ALHURAISH (2 years ago)
They have an interesting collection of ancient objects, The château was built and destroyed several times. The oldest still existing parts date from the 12th century and were built by Manassès de Seignelay (bishop from 1207 to 1221). Still standing are the main rectangular plan building, flanked by three towers, a fourth having been destroyed. It was occupied by the English during the Hundred Years' War. The rear façade was rebuilt in the Classical style by Fleuriau d'Armenonville (bishop from 1706 to 1733). Beneath the castle are dungeons, a chapel and various medieval torture instruments, including one used for water torture. In the 13th century, the bishops of Orléans abandoned the castle and it was used as a prison. Among those incarcerated there was the poet, François Villon.
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