St. Nicholas Church

Blois, France

Fleeing from the Normans and carrying with them the relics of their founder, St-Laumer, some Benedictine monks found shelter in Blois where they decided to build their abbey. the present church, today known as St. Nicolas, but whose real name is St. Laumer, was the former abbey-church.

From 1138 to 1186 these monks built the choir, the transept and the first row of columns of the abbey-church, completing it at the beginning of the next century. During the War of Religion the church was disfigured and the abbey itself destroyed by the Protestants. In the 17th and 18th centuries abbey was rebuilt, it was turned into a hospital at the time of the Revolution.

The speed with which the church was built and the sole addition of the apse chapel in the 14th century give a surprising unity to the whole. On entering the church, one could imagine that it was worked in the same stone by the same workman, for the same majestic and robust characteristics appear in all the different parts of the church. The elegant form of the choir, the crossbar, the majestic pillars of the transept-cross, the statues of people and masks which are to be found along the entire length of the building, the perspective inside the church, where the horizontal lines dominate the verticals; all this adds up to harmonious ensemble, which places the abbey-church of St. Laumer among the most remarkable examples of French medieval architecture.

However, two different periods of construction - about 20 years between them - have left the building with two different, and very marked, architectural styles. It is from the center of the church that the visitor will be able to notice these characteristics the most easily.

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Address

Rue Saint-Laumer, Blois, France
See all sites in Blois

Details

Founded: 1138-1186
Category: Religious sites in France
Historical period: Birth of Capetian dynasty (France)

Rating

4.1/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Cawa (6 months ago)
Je n'ai malheureusement pas pu y entrer cette fois-ci, mais je peux dire quelle est très jolie de l'extérieur ! La prochaine fois je m'y arrêterai pour la découvrir de l'intérieur.
Toto Test (8 months ago)
Située dans un beau quartier, calme et plein se charme cette église cait le détour.
rémi Espagnet (9 months ago)
Est une église qui a un intérêt par son ancienneté cependant cet édifice reste très vide sans réels points d'accroches que cela soit au niveau des statuts qui sont peu nombreuses et extrêmement classiques, les vitraux qui sont tous refais de style moderne qui ne s'accordent pas du tout avec le reste. Heureusement une fresque murale tapisse le plafond au dessus d'une représentation de la crucifixion.
Kyle D (12 months ago)
Very beautiful church that is a nice to see while walking around down town Blois! We even entered on a Sunday no problem. There is netting like other reviewers mentioned - hopefully they will have the budget next year to make the repairs! The church is very large in size and even had a Joan of Arc statue - I think she came here for a blessing before one of her wars. Photos as of May 2018.
Nathalie Lachot (13 months ago)
Un chef d'oeuvre de l'art roman... malheureusement en péril... si on en juge les filets tendus au-dessus de la nef (la pierre s'effrite, faute d'entretien) ! La ville de Blois qui en charge cet édifice, le néglige, et c'est bien dommage, car cette église est magnifique, tant à l'intérieur qu'à l'extérieur. Un incontournable du vieux Blois qu'il faut visiter.
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