St. Nicholas Church

Blois, France

Fleeing from the Normans and carrying with them the relics of their founder, St-Laumer, some Benedictine monks found shelter in Blois where they decided to build their abbey. the present church, today known as St. Nicolas, but whose real name is St. Laumer, was the former abbey-church.

From 1138 to 1186 these monks built the choir, the transept and the first row of columns of the abbey-church, completing it at the beginning of the next century. During the War of Religion the church was disfigured and the abbey itself destroyed by the Protestants. In the 17th and 18th centuries abbey was rebuilt, it was turned into a hospital at the time of the Revolution.

The speed with which the church was built and the sole addition of the apse chapel in the 14th century give a surprising unity to the whole. On entering the church, one could imagine that it was worked in the same stone by the same workman, for the same majestic and robust characteristics appear in all the different parts of the church. The elegant form of the choir, the crossbar, the majestic pillars of the transept-cross, the statues of people and masks which are to be found along the entire length of the building, the perspective inside the church, where the horizontal lines dominate the verticals; all this adds up to harmonious ensemble, which places the abbey-church of St. Laumer among the most remarkable examples of French medieval architecture.

However, two different periods of construction - about 20 years between them - have left the building with two different, and very marked, architectural styles. It is from the center of the church that the visitor will be able to notice these characteristics the most easily.

References:

Comments

Your name

Website (optional)



Address

Rue Saint-Laumer, Blois, France
See all sites in Blois

Details

Founded: 1138-1186
Category: Religious sites in France
Historical period: Birth of Capetian dynasty (France)

Rating

4.1/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Cawa (13 months ago)
Je n'ai malheureusement pas pu y entrer cette fois-ci, mais je peux dire quelle est très jolie de l'extérieur ! La prochaine fois je m'y arrêterai pour la découvrir de l'intérieur.
Toto Test (15 months ago)
Située dans un beau quartier, calme et plein se charme cette église cait le détour.
rémi Espagnet (16 months ago)
Est une église qui a un intérêt par son ancienneté cependant cet édifice reste très vide sans réels points d'accroches que cela soit au niveau des statuts qui sont peu nombreuses et extrêmement classiques, les vitraux qui sont tous refais de style moderne qui ne s'accordent pas du tout avec le reste. Heureusement une fresque murale tapisse le plafond au dessus d'une représentation de la crucifixion.
Kyle D (19 months ago)
Very beautiful church that is a nice to see while walking around down town Blois! We even entered on a Sunday no problem. There is netting like other reviewers mentioned - hopefully they will have the budget next year to make the repairs! The church is very large in size and even had a Joan of Arc statue - I think she came here for a blessing before one of her wars. Photos as of May 2018.
Nathalie Lachot (20 months ago)
Un chef d'oeuvre de l'art roman... malheureusement en péril... si on en juge les filets tendus au-dessus de la nef (la pierre s'effrite, faute d'entretien) ! La ville de Blois qui en charge cet édifice, le néglige, et c'est bien dommage, car cette église est magnifique, tant à l'intérieur qu'à l'extérieur. Un incontournable du vieux Blois qu'il faut visiter.
Powered by Google

Featured Historic Landmarks, Sites & Buildings

Historic Site of the week

Bergenhus Fortress

Bergenhus fortress is one of the oldest and best preserved castles in Norway. It contains buildings dating as far back as the 1240s, as well as later constructions built as recently as World War II. The extent of the enclosed area of today dates from the early 19th century. In medieval times, the area of the present-day Bergenhus Fortress was known as Holmen (The islet), and contained the royal residence in Bergen, as well as a cathedral and several churches, the bishop's residence, and a Dominican monastery. Excavations have revealed foundations of buildings believed to date back to before 1100, which might have been erected by King Olav Kyrre. In the 13th century, until 1299, Bergen was the capital of Norway and Holmen was thus the main seat of Norway's rulers. It was first enclosed by stone walls in the 1240s.

Of the medieval buildings, a medieval hall and a defensive tower remain. The royal hall, today known as Haakon's Hall, built around 1260, is the largest medieval secular building in Norway. The defensive tower, known in the Middle Ages as the keep by the sea, was built around 1270 by King Magnus VI Lagabøte, and contained a royal apartment on the top floor. In the 1560s it was incorporated by the commander of the castle, Erik Rosenkrantz, into a larger structure, which is today known as the Rosenkrantz Tower.

In the Middle Ages, several churches, including the Christ Church, Bergen's cathedral, were situated on the premises. These however were torn down in the period 1526 to 1531, as the area of Holmen was converted into a purely military fortification under Danish rule. From around this time, the name Bergenhus came into use. Building work on the Christ Church probably started around 1100. It contained the shrine of saint Sunniva, the patron saint of Bergen and western Norway. In the 12th and 13th centuries it was the site of several royal coronations and weddings. It was also the burial site of at least six kings, as well as other members of the royal family. The site of its altar is today marked by a memorial stone.

In the 19th century, the fortress lost its function as a defensive fortification, but it was retained by the military as an administrative base. After restoration in the 1890s, and again after destruction sustained during World War II, Bergenhus is today again used as a feast hall for public events. During World War II, the German navy used several of its buildings for their headquarters, and they also constructed a large concrete bunker within the fortress walls. The buildings, including the Haakon's Hall, were severely damaged when a Dutch ship in the service of the German navy, carrying approximately 120 tons of dynamite, exploded on 20 April 1944 in the harbour just outside the fortress walls, but the buildings were later restored.

Bergenhus is currently under the command of the Royal Norwegian Navy, which has about 150 military personnel stationed there. The fortifications Sverresborg fortress and Fredriksberg fortress also lie in the centre of Bergen. Haakon's Hall and the Rosenkrantz Tower are open for visits by the public. Koengen, the central part of Bergenhus Fortress is also known as a concert venue.