Schwalbach Castle

Burgschwalbach, Germany

Schwalbach Castle was built between 1354 and 1371 by Count Eberhard V. of Katzenelnbogen. Gilbrecht of Schönborn was mentioned as the count's burgmann in 1373. In the 16th century, Burgschwalbach passed to the County of Nassau. The castle has had a restauranta since the 19th century.

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Details

Founded: 1354-1371
Category: Castles and fortifications in Germany
Historical period: Habsburg Dynasty (Germany)

Rating

4/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

junior pierre (2 months ago)
Beautiful place !! I loved
Box Walt (4 months ago)
Currently been refurbished - Feb 2024
Markus J. (9 months ago)
I love this castle, I climbed all over it as a child. You couldn't have a better playground. Now we had to use the day of the open monument to see what it looks like. Hopefully it will be open to the public again soon.
Torsten Straube (9 months ago)
Just took a break on the moped tour and enjoyed the view.
Ay Doubleyou (13 months ago)
Beautiful castle. Just renovated!
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