Ēdole Castle was built for the bishop of Piltene between 1264 and 1267. It was rebuilt in the 16th century and from 1561 until 1920 it was the property of the Baltic-German Baron von Behr and his descendents.

During the 18th century the castle was expanded and from 1835 to 1841 it underwent a major reconstruction work to become one of the first samples of Neo-Gothic architecture in Kurzeme. The building was partly burned during the Russian Revolution of 1905. Between 1906 and 1907 a household yard and tower were built in one of its corners, being the façade remodelled with its Gothic forms preserved.

Originally consisting of two residential buildings linked by a stone wall, the castle is surrounded by landscape park. It is considered an architectural and archaeological monument of national importance.

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Address

Pils iela 1, Edole, Latvia
See all sites in Edole

Details

Founded: 1264-1267
Category: Castles and fortifications in Latvia
Historical period: State of the Teutonic Order (Latvia)

Rating

4.5/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Vaidotas Rinkevicius (6 months ago)
Nice castle in beatiful place!
Varis Brežģis (6 months ago)
Beautiful castle and rich muzeum with relik stuff and great geology room. Museum entry costs 5 eur per person but it's definitely worth it.
Armands Virbickis (8 months ago)
Great castle, in which is captured fantastic Latvian movie "Emīla nedarbi".
jānis markuss (9 months ago)
A palace that needs a lot of time to explore all the available rooms and places. There is even access to one of the towers, although it has the capacity of 7 people. I believe it cost me 5€ per person (without a guide)
Andrei Rakickis (11 months ago)
Wonderful castle, gives you feeling as someone lived here recently. Curious history of building and some interesting collections inside. Nice cafe inside.
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