Venta Brick Bridge

Kuldīga, Latvia

The clay brick bridge across the Venta built in 1874 is one of the longest of this type of bridge in Europe. The bridge was built according to the road standards of the 19th century (500 feet long and 26 feet wide) so that two carriages could pass each other. The bridge was repaired in 1926 after it was damaged by the Germans during World War I.

References:

Comments

Your name

Website (optional)



Details

Founded: 1874
Category:
Historical period: Part of the Russian Empire (Latvia)

More Information

www.latvia.travel

Rating

4.9/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Valdas Ozelis (39 days ago)
Yra ka pamatyti tikrai gražu.
Phibappé Tengelgren (4 months ago)
Walked from Kuldiga bus station to the waterfall and took like 25 mins. It's a very clam city and it's quite nice. Upon arriving the river and the bridge over, will see the waterfall full view. It's the widest waterfall in Europe but it's quite short in terms of the height. But still it's a nice place to spend a half day along with the city. We went also close to the waterfall from the side next to the venta rumbas, many teens were there to play with the waterfall.
Manuela Heinze (5 months ago)
Eine sehr schöne alte Brücke, die, zwar kleiner, aber entfernt an die Karlsbrücke in Prag erinnert. Der Breite Wasserfall ist ebenfalls sehr sehenswert, allerdings durch die Trockenheit in diesem Jahr wenig imposant. Ich stelle es mir jedoch unglaublich schön vor, im Sommer dort unterhalb Baden zu gehen. Wir waren am 24.09.2018 dort und es war leider schon kalt und regnerisch.
Szymon B (7 months ago)
Nice place, old-stylish bridge. Especially interesting and lively during St. John's night.
Mateusz Matula (7 months ago)
Must see :)
Powered by Google

Featured Historic Landmarks, Sites & Buildings

Historic Site of the week

Lübeck Cathedral

Lübeck Cathedral is a large brick-built Lutheran cathedral in Lübeck, Germany and part of the Lübeck UNESCO World Heritage Site. In 1173 Henry the Lion founded the cathedral to serve the Diocese of Lübeck, after the transfer in 1160 of the bishop's seat from Oldenburg in Holstein under bishop Gerold. The then Romanesque cathedral was completed around 1230, but between 1266 and 1335 it was converted into a Gothic-style building with side-aisles raised to the same height as the main aisle.

On the night of Palm Sunday (28–29 March) 1942 a Royal Air Force bombing raid destroyed a fifth of the town centre. Several bombs fell in the area around the church, causing the eastern vault of the quire to collapse and destroying the altar which dated from 1696. A fire from the neighbouring cathedral museum spread to the truss of the cathedral, and around noon on Palm Sunday the towers collapsed. An Arp Schnitger organ was lost in the flames. Nevertheless, a relatively large portion of the internal fittings was saved, including the cross and almost all of the medieval polyptychs. In 1946 a further collapse, of the gable of the north transept, destroyed the vestibule almost completely.

Reconstruction of the cathedral took several decades, as greater priority was given to the rebuilding of the Marienkirche. Work was completed only in 1982.

The cathedral is unique in that at 105 m, it is shorter than the tallest church in the city. This is the consequence of a power struggle between the church and the guilds.

The 17 m crucifix is the work of the Lübeck artist Bernt Notke. It was commissioned by the bishop of Lübeck, Albert II. Krummendiek, and erected in 1477. The carvings which decorate the rood screen are also by Notke.

Since the war, the famous altar of Hans Memling has been in the medieval collection of the St. Annen Museum, but notable polyptychs remain in the cathedral.

In the funeral chapels of the southern aisle are Baroque-era memorials by the Flemish sculptor Thomas Quellinus.