Venta Brick Bridge

Kuldīga, Latvia

The clay brick bridge across the Venta built in 1874 is one of the longest of this type of bridge in Europe. The bridge was built according to the road standards of the 19th century (500 feet long and 26 feet wide) so that two carriages could pass each other. The bridge was repaired in 1926 after it was damaged by the Germans during World War I.

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Details

Founded: 1874
Category:
Historical period: Part of the Russian Empire (Latvia)

More Information

www.latvia.travel

Rating

4.9/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Valdas Ozelis (7 months ago)
Yra ka pamatyti tikrai gražu.
Phibappé Tengelgren (10 months ago)
Walked from Kuldiga bus station to the waterfall and took like 25 mins. It's a very clam city and it's quite nice. Upon arriving the river and the bridge over, will see the waterfall full view. It's the widest waterfall in Europe but it's quite short in terms of the height. But still it's a nice place to spend a half day along with the city. We went also close to the waterfall from the side next to the venta rumbas, many teens were there to play with the waterfall.
Manuela Heinze (11 months ago)
Eine sehr schöne alte Brücke, die, zwar kleiner, aber entfernt an die Karlsbrücke in Prag erinnert. Der Breite Wasserfall ist ebenfalls sehr sehenswert, allerdings durch die Trockenheit in diesem Jahr wenig imposant. Ich stelle es mir jedoch unglaublich schön vor, im Sommer dort unterhalb Baden zu gehen. Wir waren am 24.09.2018 dort und es war leider schon kalt und regnerisch.
Szymon B (13 months ago)
Nice place, old-stylish bridge. Especially interesting and lively during St. John's night.
Mateusz Matula (13 months ago)
Must see :)
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