Grobina Castle Ruins

Grobiņa, Latvia

The Livonian Order erected Grobiņa Castle in 1253 to protect the roads from Livonia to Prussia. It was a square type building and was a three storey high living block in the southern aisle. It also had a gate tower in the middle of the western wall. The castle was built of bricks and crude stone. Once it had arched ceilings. It was a residence for the local viceroy of the Livonian Order from 1399 to 1590. As support base in south Courland it was many times rebuilt and fortified.

In the times of the Duchy of Courland, the castle was destroyed and rebuilt many times. In the sixteenth and seventeenth century sand walls were erected around the castle. They had a bastion in each of the four corners and a stockade. Later the castle was used as a residence for local German landlords. The castle was destroyed in the eighteenth century. Many famous people have visited the castle, for example: Duke Jacob Kettler of Courland, The King of Sweden, Carl XII and the King of Prussia, Friedrich Wilhelm III.

In the 1970s major conservation jobs were made in the castle, so today the castle ruins are in a quite good condition. Most of the walls are still standing in three story height. Today's castle is a major tourist attraction and also a place for local gatherings and concerts.

The ancient Curonian castle hill (Skābāržu kalns) is located only 100 m from the castle. It is supposed to be the famous Seeburg, which is mentioned in Scandinavian sources already in 9th century.

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Details

Founded: 1253
Category: Miscellaneous historic sites in Latvia
Historical period: State of the Teutonic Order (Latvia)

More Information

en.wikipedia.org

Rating

4.4/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Jamie Stephen (5 years ago)
Second time seen, being renovated. Great castle attraction.
Daiga Stera (5 years ago)
Jurmalciems
Thesurikats (6 years ago)
I loved it
anton notna (6 years ago)
Ruins of an old viking castle, stage is set up when events happen, neat place with majestic look from hill to a lake, previously a river part that has changed its flow. Clean place with free WC before entrance.
Janis Cevers (6 years ago)
This site offers very little to see. There are numerous castles and castle ruins in Latvia in much better shape.
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