St. Anne’s Church

Liepāja, Latvia

St. Anne’s Lutheran Church is one of the largest and certainly the oldest church in Liepaja. First written references about this church were found in documents dated in 1508. Initially wooden St. Anne’s Church was built by the Master of Livonian Order and was located elsewhere in Liepaja. Construction works of the wooden church were finished in 1587. In the 17th century, the wooden church was bordered with brick walls, the tower was raised up and the majestic baroque style hand made wooden altar of 9.7 meter height, and 5.8 meter width was projected and built by Nicholas Sofrensa. During 17th, 18th and 19th centuries the building was several times renewed, rebuilt and renovated. In the end of the 19th century city architect MP Berchi order to rebuild the tower of the Church.

In the end of 19th century master Karl Hermann designed large organs - the owner of a majestic sound. The spellbinding Gothic style façade and remarkable interior are worth of seeing. Dark wooden seats are pointed into an outstanding three levels wooden altar embellished with wooden figures of the Saints’.

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Details

Founded: 16th century
Category: Religious sites in Latvia
Historical period: Duchy of Livonia (Latvia)

More Information

www.way2latvia.com

Rating

4.7/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

TheRin30 (2 months ago)
Лютеранская церковь Святой Анны до перестройки была старейшей в Лиепае (1508г). Нынешнее здание этой церкви построено в 1893 году. В церкви есть орган. Тихое, спокойное место. Убранство и интерьер без излишеств.
riveredgeman (4 months ago)
Angelika Lall (6 months ago)
The beautiful church.
Vladimirs Selms (10 months ago)
Very quiet place
Mārtiņš Uztics (2 years ago)
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