Bauska Castle

Bauska, Latvia

Bauska Castle is a complex consisting of the ruins of an earlier castle and a later palace. The impressive castle stands on the narrow peninsula at the confluence of the rivers Mūsa and Mēmele where they form the Lielupe river. In ancient times, the hill was the site of an ancient Semigallian fortress. The first stone buildings were established between 1443 and 1456 by the Livonian branch of the Teutonic Knights and construction continued till the end of the 16th century. The old section of the castle featured a great watch tower, 3.5 meter thick walls, a prison under the tower, a garrison, and a drawbridge at the gates.

After the collapse of the Teutonic Order in this area in 1562, Bauska Castle became the residence of the Dukes of Courland, for whom the adjacent palace was built in the 17th century. In 1702, during the Great Northern War, both castle and palace were blown up and left abandoned.

Only ruins remain from the seat of the Livonian order. The palace, however, is fully restored and can be visited daily during the summer months. Visitors can explore the castle, visit the museum, eat in the café, and climb the castle keep lookout tower, which has an extensive panoramic view of the surrounding city and countryside. And in every July an international festival of medieval music is held here.

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Details

Founded: 1443-1456
Category: Castles and fortifications in Latvia
Historical period: State of the Teutonic Order (Latvia)

Rating

4.5/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Inga Subashi (2 years ago)
Very beautiful place.very kind and helpful workers. But people with disabilities will not be able to look around too much if they will not have someone who can carry them up and down. Because Castle have lot of steers and no elevators.
Jingxing Zou (2 years ago)
Worth a visit. Lots of information and beautiful view of the river. Very nice stuff
Aivars Selegovskis (2 years ago)
Great place. Beautiful landscape around and kind personal. Very good price for whole family, less then 10 euro, thats great that city thinks about families.
Mimi Puppa (2 years ago)
Gorgeous castle. Fantastically remodeled, truly a hidden gem. Family tickets are very affordable and the restaurant is one of the BEST I have ever been to! You will NOT regret the food. Fish and soups are delicious. Cheese cake is FANTASTIC.
Laima Nandi (2 years ago)
Would be all 5 stars f there would be cafe inside castle, some more small shops besides cute winery. Atmosphere is wonderful, also clean and renovated premises. Catch soms festival what happens there - it is really great to be there then.
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