Mežotne Palace was built in Classicism style during 1798-1802 for a teacher and governess of the grandchildren of Russian Empress Catherine II, Charlotte von Lieven (1742–1828). Architects of the palace were famous Italian Giacomo Quarenghi and Johann Gottfried Adam Berlitz, architect of the Durbe Manor and the Kazdanga palace. Simultaneously with the palace there has also been developed an English style landscape park and complex of subsidiary buildings, creating one of the most impressive Classicism style ensembles in Latvia.

The palace suffered heavily in the First and later in the Second World War. The Lieven family owned the palace up to agrarian reform in 1920. Palace and park underwent reconstruction in 2001 and since then a hotel is located there.

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Details

Founded: 1798-1802
Category: Palaces, manors and town halls in Latvia
Historical period: Part of the Russian Empire (Latvia)

Rating

4.4/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Mareks Karpinskis (13 months ago)
Very nice venue.
Jānis Olekšs (16 months ago)
Nice place to wak around.
Une Kavaliauskaite (unekavaliauskaite) (2 years ago)
During our visit there where many Nato shoulders out there!
Manja Baker-Neuhaus (2 years ago)
What a great hotel, I slept wonderfully! And the dinner was excellent, with carefully arranged flavors. The staff was very friendly; there were few people so they took the time to chat. Very pleasant stay.
Janis Bibers (2 years ago)
The "park" (if you can even call it so) looks abandoned. Seems the owners care only about the money they get from hotel. :( If you stay at the hotel, you won't see more than those 4 hotel room walls. Sad that someone else doesn't own that place. It has a great potential.
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