Mežotne Palace was built in Classicism style during 1798-1802 for a teacher and governess of the grandchildren of Russian Empress Catherine II, Charlotte von Lieven (1742–1828). Architects of the palace were famous Italian Giacomo Quarenghi and Johann Gottfried Adam Berlitz, architect of the Durbe Manor and the Kazdanga palace. Simultaneously with the palace there has also been developed an English style landscape park and complex of subsidiary buildings, creating one of the most impressive Classicism style ensembles in Latvia.

The palace suffered heavily in the First and later in the Second World War. The Lieven family owned the palace up to agrarian reform in 1920. Palace and park underwent reconstruction in 2001 and since then a hotel is located there.

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Details

Founded: 1798-1802
Category: Palaces, manors and town halls in Latvia
Historical period: Part of the Russian Empire (Latvia)

Rating

4.3/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Ikars Ūdrēns (8 months ago)
Ok
C Hagelberg (10 months ago)
Beautiful place and friendly staff. We got married here
Crimson Mustache Hamil (12 months ago)
Beautiful place to stay.
Remco Jonker (12 months ago)
Situated in the countryside this former small summer Palace has been converted to a hotel. Rooms are nicely decorated in the style of the era. The standard rooms are small the special rooms very spacious. Bathrooms are fine. I would have appreciated a coffee/tea maker and a small fridge. Public spaces are a bit staid. At the time my visit there was very little staff who were a bit reserved. Dinner and breakfast in the restaurant were a reminder of communist times, a dinner menu with one of the two main courses not available for instance. Free parking.
Viktor Platonov (12 months ago)
Hotel is not good, as museum - very bad guide, very bad exposition
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