Rolfstorp Church

Rolfstorp, Sweden

The nave of Rolfstorp Church was built in the 1200s in Romanesque style. In 17th century the church was enlarged and the current tower was added in 1926. It replaced the earlier wooden belfry.

The interior is decorated with medieval mural paintings, dating from from the 14th and 15th centuries.The Baroque-style altarpiece dates from 1655 and is made by master Jonas Abilla. The pulpit was also made in 1655. The stone-made baptismal font dates from the 13th century. It has a carving Thorkillus me fecit, Thorkel has made for me. Thorkel was probably a stone master from Halland.

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Details

Founded: 13th century
Category: Religious sites in Sweden
Historical period: Consolidation (Sweden)

Rating

4.3/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Johan Wahlström (2 years ago)
Ett besök på våren är toppen, då ska du se rosorna blomma i ett av kyrkfönstren.
Tord Sand (2 years ago)
Rolfstorps kyrka och fönstret med "ROSEN" är fantastiskt vackert att beskåda! Kyrkan i sig är vacker och fönstret där denna ros växer är vida känd och välbesökt för långväga gäster. Rosen växer emellan fönsterpartier och har sannolikt varit i en rabatt utanför kyrkan innan den byggdes till. Här finns även en stor shop med souvenirer som alltid är öppen då kyrkan står öppen. Donera pengar i boxen och ta det ni önskar samt sprid foton och information om denna gudomligt fina plats. Guds frid till er alla!
Lennart Andersson (2 years ago)
Stefan Ingemarsson (3 years ago)
こぴ (3 years ago)
バスの乗り継ぎ合間に立ち寄りました。
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