Tyresö Palace

Tyresö, Sweden

The construction of the Tyresö palace began in the 1620s by the Riksdrots Gabriel Oxenstierna and completed in 1636. He also constructed the nearby Tyresö Church, which was inaugurated with his own burial in 1641.

The palace was inherited by Maria Sofia De la Gardie in 1648, who had married Gustaf Gabrielsson Oxenstierna, nephew of Swedish Regent and Lord High Chancellor Axel Oxenstierna. Both her and her husband's family were extremely wealthy. Maria Sofia resided in Tyresö Palace, from where she managed her estates around Baltic Sea.

During 1770s the palace was modernized and the first English garden in Sweden was created. Planned by the garden architect Fredrik Magnus Piper, it is a mixture of an English park, a Swedish flowery meadow and picture out of a fairy tale - with the ancient forest as its ultimate source. The natural-appearing large-scale landscape gardens still exist today.

Today Tyresö Palace is a museum. Marquis Claes Lagergren had purchased Tyresö Palace in 1892. Assisted by architect Isak Gustaf Clason, the Marquis rebuilt the castle, inspired by original drawings from the 17th century. The Marquis wanted the castle kept as a living document of Swedish history. He rebuilt large parts of the castle in a national romantic style. The marquis died in 1930, and in his will left Tyresö Palace to a museum foundation, the Nordic Museum (Nordiska museet). Today the Nordic Museum owns the castle, and it is open for guided tours during the summer.

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Address

Tyresö Slott, Tyresö, Sweden
See all sites in Tyresö

Details

Founded: 1620-1636
Category: Palaces, manors and town halls in Sweden
Historical period: Swedish Empire (Sweden)

Rating

4.3/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Andrew Cheese (9 months ago)
Take the tour. Audio guide provided in many languages so you can take your time. Afterwards take a stroll the park. Don't forget to bring picnic.
Kenneth Ingraham (11 months ago)
Nothing much to say about the castel but the surroundings more than make up for it. I don't want to sound like it was a mistake going there - have gone there twice and will not hesitate to keep returning. The meadows, hills, water, Island, etc., Make for a great spot to picnic with the whole family. Highly recommended if you want a relaxing day out with loved ones.
Sreeni C (12 months ago)
Excellent place for scenic beauty, the palace will be closed during winter. There's a small island kind of area where you can enjoy the weather near waterfront. Lots of apple trees around and you should be lucky to get a ripened one..
Martin T Focazio (16 months ago)
A very nice place if you enjoy nature, hiking, and just sitting around and blissing out. There's nothing major to do here, which sometimes is exactly the thing you want to do. A lovely pastoral setting.
Gilbert Lidholm (16 months ago)
Beautiful furniture and interesting history. Cheap entrens and free use of device where you can listen to the history of most rooms. Nice gardens and pretty views.
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