The Stockholm Palace (Kungliga Slottet) is the official residence and major royal palace of the Swedish monarch. The offices of the monarch and the other members of the Swedish Royal Family as well as the offices of the Royal Court of Sweden are located there. The palace is used for representative purposes by the King whilst performing his duties as the head of state.

The first building on this site was a fortress with a core tower built in the 13th century by Birger Jarl to defend Lake Mälaren. The fortress grew to a palace, named Tre Kronor ("Three Crowns") after the core towers' spire. In the late 16th century, much work was done to transform the old fortress into a Renaissance-style palace under King John III. In 1690, it was decided to rebuild the palace in Baroque style after a design by Nicodemus Tessin the Younger. In 1692, work began on the northern row. It was complete in 1697, but much of the palace was destroyed in a fire on May 7, 1697.

Tessin rebuilt the damaged palace, and work continued for another 63 years. Half-round wings around the outer western courtyard were finished in 1734, the palace church was finished in the 1740s, and the exterior was finished in 1754. The royal family moved to the palace with the southwest, southeast, and northeast wings finished. The northwest wing was finished in 1760. In the north, the Lejonbacken ("Lion's Slope") was rebuilt from 1824 to 1830. Its name comes from the Medici lions-inspired sculptures that stand there.

The palace is guarded by the Högvakten, a royal guard of members of the Swedish Armed Forces. The guard dates back to the early 16th century.

Today the Royal Palace has 1430 rooms, 660 with windows and is one of the largest royal palaces in the world still in use for its original purpose. It contains several interesting things to see. In addition to the Royal Apartments there are three museums steeped in regal history: the Treasury with the regalia, the Tre Kronor Museum that portrays the palaces medieval history and Gustav III's Museum of Antiquities.

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Details

Founded: 17th - 18th century
Category: Palaces, manors and town halls in Sweden
Historical period: Swedish Empire (Sweden)

Rating

4.4/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Gary Boxall (8 months ago)
Didn't go inside - just watched the changing of the guard. Worth seeing if you're there (12:15 daily I understand) but it isn't anything realky exciting to be honest so don't be upset if you miss it. Shop is full of usual rubbish so only visit that if you collect junk
Linda Rots Lohela (9 months ago)
Beautiful location on the outskirts of the old town in Stockholm. Time it right and you get to enjoy the ceremony of the change of the royal guard. Well worth checking the time for before you go. The museum in the basement of the castle is really nice with many historical artifacts from different royals.
Dániel Karáth (9 months ago)
Free WiFi at the throne room, very cool!
JANA HSASO (10 months ago)
Very nice place and one of the best places in Sweden, You see the number of people that is working over there. We came on the day when the museum was open for the public and we saw all kingdom history with all the dressing and the crowns beside of the swords and etc. I would see it will be much better if you have more lighting at the museum, nevertheless, the place is amazing and visiting it in Summer will leave you with a great memory.
Joseph Massey (10 months ago)
The palace is full of beautiful rooms and objects, with some lovely portraits and busts of Swedish monarchs. There is a wing dedicated to the various Swedish royal orders - full of amazing medals and costumes - and the rooms used during official events like State Visits, which it is great to see in person.
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