Axel Oxenstierna Palace

Stockholm, Sweden

Axel Oxenstierna palace in the Old Town of Stockholm was designed by architect Jean de la Vallée to Chancellor Axel Oxenstierna and the construction started in 1653. The palace became the headquarters for the 1668-1680 Swedish Central Bank and after a series of state institutional policy.

The palace is uniquely conserved in particular to the exterior. There are state historic building since 1935 and is one of the Swedish architectural art's most significant and well-preserved works.

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Details

Founded: 1653
Category: Palaces, manors and town halls in Sweden
Historical period: Swedish Empire (Sweden)

More Information

en.wikipedia.org

Rating

4.6/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Patrick Kiesenebner (5 years ago)
We had a good time. It was just a parade
matt jackson (6 years ago)
Great place to visit, be sure to head to the underground museum and see the history behind the palace. Very cool. Also, you may be lucky and catch the King and Queen.
Toan Vo (6 years ago)
Great and beautiful landmark in the nice location of the city!
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