Kirkkokari (the Church Islet) is a small island in the Lake Köyliö. It is the only Roman Catholic pilgrimage site in Finland and one of the few in Nordic countries. The 0,30 hectare islet is also called as the Saint Henry's Island.

According to an old legend, Saint Henry was murdered on the ice of Lake Köyliö nearby Kirkkokari in January 1156. During the 13th century the island became a pilgrimage site for Catholics. It was named by a chapel that was built on the island in the 14th century. Foundations of the church are still seen in Kirkkokari as well as the monument of Christianization of Finland (1955) and Saint Henry's altar, which was built in 1999.

The Finnish Roman Catholic Church arranges an yearly pilgrimage to Kirkkokari via the Saint Henry's Road. The 140 kilometre long journey starts from the city of Turku. It ends on a memorial service in Kirkkokari on the last pre-Midsummer sunday.

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