The Ulvila Church, dedicated to St. Olaf, is one of the most significant medieval buildings in Finland. The first church was built probably in 13th century to Liikistö, which was a local trade centre. According old documents the graveyard around the church was consecrated in 1347 and church was burnt badly in 1429. Historians believe that the present stone church was built after that between 1495-1510.

There are several medieval and newer artefacts inside the church, for example crucifix and statue of St. Olaf from the 1430s and communion cup from the end of Middle Ages.

The Church has been renovated several times. During the latest renovation in 2005 archaeologists found the biggest medieval coin treasure in Finland. It was buried near the sacristy stone wall in 1390s and included 1476 silver coins.

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Address

Saarentie 2-44, Ulvila, Finland
See all sites in Ulvila

Details

Founded: 1495-1510
Category: Religious sites in Finland
Historical period: Middle Ages (Finland)

Rating

4.2/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Markku Hellgrén (3 months ago)
Siunausta
Kauno Vastinesluoma (12 months ago)
Hieno keskiaikainen kirkko
Kukkulankunkku (14 months ago)
Ihan hieno paikka
Lea Pietilainen (2 years ago)
Suosittelen!
Jesse Peltonen (3 years ago)
Äärettömän kaunis kirkko
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