St. Henry's Chapel

Kokemäki, Finland

The St. Henry's Chapel is a medieval wooden barn, which was surrounded by the present brick chapel in 1857. According the legend St. Henry, the first bishop of Finland, spent his last night in the barn before local peasant Lalli murdered him in 1156. Although according modern archeological investigations oldest parts of the barn were made in 1472-1473. Oldest records from the 17th century tells that the barn has been a destination for local pilgrimages.

Senate of Finland decided to protect the barn as the national heritage in 1839. Architect Pehr Johan Gylich designed the chapel around barn to shelter it. The chapel was inaugurated in 1857.

The chapel is open to the public in July with no admission fee.

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Address

Risteentie 2-18, Kokemäki, Finland
See all sites in Kokemäki

Details

Founded: 1857 (the Chapel)
Category: Religious sites in Finland
Historical period: Russian Grand Duchy (Finland)

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