Kokemäki Church

Kokemäki, Finland

Kokemäki Church was built between 1780-1786 and named after Gustav III, the King of Sweden. It was designed by J. Sytti an C. F. Adercrantz. The original church was expanded to the present cruciform shape in 1886. The altarpiece is painted by S. Tvoroschnikoff and it’s based on Rafael’s (1483-1520) masterpiece with the same name.

On Christmas eve 1882 Kokemäki church was full of people when suddenly all were frightened that the church is on fire. Three people died in panic and several injured.

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Details

Founded: 1780-1786
Category: Religious sites in Finland
Historical period: The Age of Enlightenment (Finland)

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3.6/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Sari Puhakka (3 years ago)
Kokemäen Kivikirkko on mielestäni erittäin kaunis kirkko, joka sijaitsee hyvin keskeisellä paikalla Kokemäkeä. Kirkon läheisyysdessä sijaitsee hautausmaa, jossa sijaitsee myös Sankarimuistomerkki, joka on mielestäni vaikuttava. Mielestäni Sotaveteraaneja tulisi muistaa ja kunnioittaa, sillä Heidän ansiostaan saamme elää Itsenäisessä Suomessa.
Marko M (3 years ago)
Kokemäen kivikirkko eli Kustaa III:nen kirkko ei ole keskiaikainen, vaikka se ulkoasultaan sellaista hyvin pitkälti muistuttaakin. Kirkko on rakennettu vasta vuosina 1780-1786 ja on alunperin ollut itä-länsi -suuntainen yksilaivainen pitkäkirkko, joka myöhemmin on laajennettu ristikirkoksi. Suunnittelijoille ja rakentajille voi antaa täydet pisteet siitä, miten hyvin he ovat onnistuneet jäljittelemään keskiaikaisen kivikirkon ulkoasua. Toivottavasti jossain vaiheessa ehdin käydä myös sisätiloissa.
Marko Pasanen (3 years ago)
Kirkko
Marko Pasanen (3 years ago)
Aina sama virsi ;)
Olli Mustonen (3 years ago)
Kaunis harmaakivikirkko sijaitsee keskellä Kokemäen keskustaa. Kirkon puistossa on vanha hautausmaa ja sankarivainajien muistomerkki. Istumapaikkoja kirkossa on n.1200.
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