Vadstena Castle

Vadstena, Sweden

Vadstena Castle was originally built by King Gustav I in 1545 as a fortress to protect Stockholm from enemies from the south. The fortress consisted of three smaller stone buildings facing the lake, Vättern, three 31 meter wide ramparts, a courtyard, a moat and four circular cannons turrets. The original ramparts were torn down in the 19th century and the present ramparts were inaugurated in 1999. The stone buildings later formed the ground floor of the castle.

On August 22, 1552, King Gustav I married his third wife, Catherine Stenbock, in Vadstena. One of the castle banqueting halls is called The Wedding Hall, although its construction wasn't finished in time for the wedding. The reconstruction from fortress into a castle began in the 1550s, when prince Magnus became Duke of Östergötland. Duke Magnus had a mental illness and was the only son of Gustav I who didn't become king of Sweden. Magnus died in 1595 and is buried in the nearby Abbey Church.

In 1620 the castle construction was completed and all the kings of the House of Vasa up till then had led the construction. Since 1620, the castle has been very well preserved, and is one of Sweden's best examples of Renaissance architecture. Vadstena Castle was a royal palace until 1716, when the royal family lost interest in it; after which it became a storage for grain.

Since 1899, the castle has housed the Provincial Archives and today visitors can also find a Castle Museum with 16th and 17th century furniture, portraits and paintings. During summers the courtyard plays host to many concerts; both classical and pop music.

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Details

Founded: 1545
Category: Castles and fortifications in Sweden
Historical period: Early Vasa Era (Sweden)

Rating

4.3/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Carl Niclas (2 years ago)
Vadstena Castle is a fantastic 16th century keep, complete with a moat, dungeons and a grand ballroom. It is very well kept nowadays and be sure to get a guided tour for all the extra fun information about its former inhabitants and events over the centuries. It's quite spectacular and very much worth a long detour.
chadi zeidan (2 years ago)
Great place and neighbourhood.. the forest and the lac very nice
Caspar Dyssel (2 years ago)
Surprisingly good museum. Make sure to see it all. You can get through it in ca. 90 minutes.
Andreas Karlsson (2 years ago)
Great venue! A historical place with great atmosphere. We had our wedding here in the rentable part of the castle and got help from the person responsible with contacts for both food, tables and so on. The best day of my life in a great place! 5/5 would marry here again!
Udana Perera (2 years ago)
Historical sight, it was informative and got to know the history behind making the castle. Videos are available in 3 different languages at the site. Quite insightful and it's good to watch it. Top floor will be open at specific times, kindly check with the assistant when you purchase your ticket.
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