Eksjö Church

Eksjö, Sweden

Eksjö Church was built in the later part of the 19th century to the designs of architect J. F. Åbom. Much of the inventory was retained from the earlier church that stood on the site, whose structure is partly incorporated. The altarpiece and pulpit are both 17th century works. The organ facade dates from the 18th century. The church is a popular venue for organ recitals. It stands in the heart of the town.

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Address

Stora Torget 8, Eksjö, Sweden
See all sites in Eksjö

Details

Founded: 1887-1889
Category: Religious sites in Sweden
Historical period: Union with Norway and Modernization (Sweden)

More Information

eng.visiteksjo.se

Rating

4.5/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Dima Harba (12 months ago)
A church right in the middle of Eksjö. Has bells and a clock that ring alot. One of Eksjös attractions. I usually go there with the school as it is spacious and can hold a huge number of people. Very beautiful and big on the inside. It is not cold in there either. Maybe a bit old but it surely gives you the feeling of antiquity.
Björn Zarelius (2 years ago)
Eh helt otrolig vacker kyrka. Varit här !?! Några gånger
Frank Kallies (2 years ago)
Ok Bjorne
Andy Mac (3 years ago)
Eksjö kyrka, en gammal och fin plats som man håller alla skolavslutningar i samt har en hel del konserter under hela året.
Kennetyh Norrlin (3 years ago)
Väldigt vacker kyrka otroligt mysigt.
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