Eksjö Church

Eksjö, Sweden

Eksjö Church was built in the later part of the 19th century to the designs of architect J. F. Åbom. Much of the inventory was retained from the earlier church that stood on the site, whose structure is partly incorporated. The altarpiece and pulpit are both 17th century works. The organ facade dates from the 18th century. The church is a popular venue for organ recitals. It stands in the heart of the town.

Comments

Your name



Address

Stora Torget 8, Eksjö, Sweden
See all sites in Eksjö

Details

Founded: 1887-1889
Category: Religious sites in Sweden
Historical period: Union with Norway and Modernization (Sweden)

Rating

4.6/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

romywebb se (2 years ago)
Eksjö Church is a nice white church building. Located by the main square on the other side of the City Hotel. The bell tower appears from afar. The special design of the back appealed to me a lot and nice trees adorn the little place around the church. There is a memorial stone on one side and a handicap ramp.
Robert Tominc (3 years ago)
Lovely church a little ancestral of military
BJÖRN Z (3 years ago)
Nice church quiet or nice beautiful inside
Dima Harba (3 years ago)
A church right in the middle of Eksjö. Has bells and a clock that ring alot. One of Eksjös attractions. I usually go there with the school as it is spacious and can hold a huge number of people. Very beautiful and big on the inside. It is not cold in there either. Maybe a bit old but it surely gives you the feeling of antiquity.
Dima Harba (3 years ago)
A church right in the middle of Eksjö. Has bells and a clock that ring alot. One of Eksjös attractions. I usually go there with the school as it is spacious and can hold a huge number of people. Very beautiful and big on the inside. It is not cold in there either. Maybe a bit old but it surely gives you the feeling of antiquity.
Powered by Google

Featured Historic Landmarks, Sites & Buildings

Historic Site of the week

Caerleon Roman Amphitheatre

Built around AD 90 to entertain the legionaries stationed at the fort of Caerleon (Isca), the impressive amphitheatre was the Roman equivalent of today’s multiplex cinema. Wooden benches provided seating for up to 6,000 spectators, who would gather to watch bloodthirsty displays featuring gladiatorial combat and exotic wild animals.

Long after the Romans left, the amphitheatre took on a new life in Arthurian legend. Geoffrey of Monmouth, the somewhat imaginative 12th-century scholar, wrote in his History of the Kings of Britain that Arthur was crowned in Caerleon and that the ruined amphitheatre was actually the remains of King Arthur’s Round Table.

Today it is the most complete Roman amphitheatre in Britain.