Djursholm Castle

Djursholm, Sweden

Djursholm castle includes building components from the late Middle Ages. It was the main building of the Djursholm estate, which was owned by the House of Banér from 1508-1813. Nils Eskilsson (Banér), who was lord of Djursholm 1508 to 1520, built a new palace at the place where Djursholm Castle remains.

Djursholm Castle was the residence of both Privy Councillour Gustaf Banér and his son, Field Marshal Johan Banér. Svante Gustavsson Banér gave the castle its present appearance in the 17th century. By the mid 17th century the castle was its present size. The main hall was fitted at this time, with plaster ceilings, stairs castle was of limestone and oak, and walls hung with art wallpaper full of gilt leather and other materials.

In 1891, Djursholms secondary school (Djursholms samskola) was started in the building. Until 1910, Djursholms secondary school operated on the premises. The first inspector of Djursholms samskolas was author Viktor Rydberg. Among the earliest teachers were Erik Axel Karlfeldt and Alice Tegner. Writer Elsa Beskow was an art teacher and her husband, theologian Natanael Beskow served as the headmaster of the school from 1897 to 1909.

In the 1890s, the castle was restored in Baroque style. Facade design was simplified by a new restoration from 1959 to 1961. A new entrance with modern suitability to the castle was built on the north side in 2003. Today it serves as the community center (kommunhus) in Danderyd Municipality.

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Address

Slottet, Djursholm, Sweden
See all sites in Djursholm

Details

Founded: 17th century
Category: Castles and fortifications in Sweden
Historical period: Swedish Empire (Sweden)

More Information

en.wikipedia.org

Rating

4.2/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Axel (2 months ago)
Platsen är väldigt fin. Tyvärr har giriga politiker beslutat att använda skattepengarna till att bara låta politikerna avnjuta Djursholms slott. Man kan dock smita in om man låtsas höra hemma här.
Tina Björk (3 months ago)
Fin miljö, god mat o trevlig personal
mikael jonsson (5 months ago)
Det var kul . Men det är ju bara kommun som bor där
Roland Levin (6 months ago)
Mycket fint ställe att ha bröllopsmiddag på.
toby day (13 months ago)
It was a long way from the front gate to the front door. Very tiring. None of the staff wee dressed in period costume, like other castles I have visited. Not sure what period it was built but pretty sure they were dressed in modern Swedish clothes.
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