Görväln House is documented from the 1460s when it was owned by the Archdiocese of Uppsala. After the Protestant Reformation in 1520, Görväln became a kronohemman, owned by King Johan III until 1571, when Johan III gave it away to the nobleman Antonius de Palma and his family. Between 1605–1661 Görväln was owned by the Swedish noble family Bjelke. During the Bjelke era the main building was lower on the connector than today. During Adolph John I's years as owner, a new main building was built.

Today Görväln House is used as a hotel and restaurant.

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Details

Founded: 17th century
Category: Palaces, manors and town halls in Sweden
Historical period: Swedish Empire (Sweden)

Rating

4.3/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Morgan Fallbrink (2 years ago)
Beautiful surroundings and friendly and helpful staff. Anazing food!
Ingemar Walldén (2 years ago)
Amazing place and of corse so good food.
Björn Andersson (2 years ago)
Romantic small castle close to Stockholm. Perfect for a weekend getaway. Nice surroundings as well
Robert Hedman (2 years ago)
Room Good, view excellent! Sadly they tried to make us pay twice for the stay and make us pay for someone else's dinner. Was expecting a place of this quality to keep a closer eye on money and accounting.
Klavs Eglitis (2 years ago)
Location and facilities are just amazing! Really loved the place and would highly recommend to visit. But there is a reason why I am not giving 5 starts. We had dinner at the restaurant but needed to wait for our starter to arrive around 50 min, which brought the really good mood we had down. Next day during the breakfast it was little bit the same. While food is served from 08:30 till 11:30. Large parts of food was missing my 9:30 when we came for breakfast (bread, muesli, coffee, fruits). I think this due to that they didnt have enough staff to work there at that moment. But over all we really enjoyed the stay.
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