Vilnius Town Hall

Vilnius, Lithuania

The town hall in Vilnius was mentioned for the first time in 1432. Initially it was a Gothic style building, and has since been reconstructed many times. The current Vilnius Town Hall was rebuilt in neoclassical style according to the design by Laurynas Gucevičius in 1799. It has remained unchanged since then. Its Gothic cellars have been preserved and may be visited. Nowadays it is used for representational purposes as well as during the visits of foreign state officials and rulers. The Town Hall Square at the end of the Pilies Street is a traditional centre of trade and events in Vilnius.

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Founded: 1799
Category: Palaces, manors and town halls in Lithuania

Rating

4.5/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Planet Airlines (4 years ago)
A central point for Vilnius , the Rotuse or town hall is also an information centre! Beautiful at day or night!
Kayleigh Hartwell (4 years ago)
Lovely building with plenty of information brochures.
Jeff Clay (4 years ago)
5 star square in front of a 4 star building. Go at dusk, climb the steps and watch.
Aurimas Nausėda (4 years ago)
Special place to see photos and enjoy the warmth of the Old town
Paul B (5 years ago)
The building itself is interesting and has a deep history. It's unfortunate that the Vilnius Municipality has not invested in renovation and does not make full use of this venue. The building occasionally hosts concerts, art exhibitions and various events, including a Christmas Bazaar by all of the local embassies (charity event). But, with a little bit of investment, it could be one of the top venues in Vilnius. Three stars for unrealised potential.
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