Vilnius Town Hall

Vilnius, Lithuania

The town hall in Vilnius was mentioned for the first time in 1432. Initially it was a Gothic style building, and has since been reconstructed many times. The current Vilnius Town Hall was rebuilt in neoclassical style according to the design by Laurynas Gucevičius in 1799. It has remained unchanged since then. Its Gothic cellars have been preserved and may be visited. Nowadays it is used for representational purposes as well as during the visits of foreign state officials and rulers. The Town Hall Square at the end of the Pilies Street is a traditional centre of trade and events in Vilnius.

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Founded: 1799
Category: Palaces, manors and town halls in Lithuania

Rating

4.5/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Planet Airlines (3 years ago)
A central point for Vilnius , the Rotuse or town hall is also an information centre! Beautiful at day or night!
Kayleigh Hartwell (3 years ago)
Lovely building with plenty of information brochures.
Jeff Clay (3 years ago)
5 star square in front of a 4 star building. Go at dusk, climb the steps and watch.
Aurimas Nausėda (3 years ago)
Special place to see photos and enjoy the warmth of the Old town
Paul B (4 years ago)
The building itself is interesting and has a deep history. It's unfortunate that the Vilnius Municipality has not invested in renovation and does not make full use of this venue. The building occasionally hosts concerts, art exhibitions and various events, including a Christmas Bazaar by all of the local embassies (charity event). But, with a little bit of investment, it could be one of the top venues in Vilnius. Three stars for unrealised potential.
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Beckov Castle

The Beckov castle stands on a steep 50 m tall rock in the village Beckov. The dominance of the rock and impression of invincibility it gaves, challenged our ancestors to make use of these assets. The result is a remarkable harmony between the natural setting and architecture.

The castle first mentioned in 1200 was originally owned by the King and later, at the end of the 13th century it fell in hands of Matúš Èák. Its owners alternated - at the end of the 14th century the family of Stibor of Stiborice bought it.

The next owners, the Bánffys who adapted the Gothic castle to the Renaissance residence, improved its fortifications preventing the Turks from conquering it at the end of the 16th century. When Bánffys died out, the castle was owned by several noble families. It fell in decay after fire in 1729.

The history of the castle is the subject of different legends. One of them narrates the origin of the name of castle derived from that of jester Becko for whom the Duke Stibor had the castle built.

Another legend has it that the lord of the castle had his servant thrown down from the rock because he protected his child from the lords favourite dog. Before his death, the servant pronounced a curse saying that they would meet in a year and days time, and indeed precisely after that time the lord was bitten by a snake and fell down to the same abyss.

The well-conserved ruins of the castle, now the National Cultural Monument, are frequently visited by tourists, above all in July when the castle festival takes place. The former Ambro curia situated below the castle now shelters the exhibition of the local history.