Orthodox Holy Spirit Church

Vilnius, Lithuania

The complex of the Holy Spirit church and adjacent monastery was established in 1567. The construction was ordered by the King of Lithuania-Poland Wladyslaw Vasa. By the end of the 16th century, a monastery, a school and a printing shop were situated next to the church. In 1749 the church was badly damaged by fire.

After the reconstruction between 1749-1753 (made by architect January Kristof Glaubic) the church became the only Baroque style Orthodox sanctuary in Lithuania. The interior was crowned by a wooden iconostas resembling the Catholic altar, under which a crypt was built for the relics of Orthodox saints Anthony, John and Eustatius. In 1853 the relics were relocated to a new reliquary. The last reconstruction of the church was accomplished on the initiative of N. Muravyov. The monastery complex comprises two monasteries: the friary of Holy Spirit (built at the intersection in the 15th and 16th centuries) and the convent of Holy Mary Magdalene (built in the late 16th century). Both buildings (reconstructed in the 19th century) have Gothic fragments.

Today Holy Spirit church is the main Orthodox Church in Lithuania. The male and female monasteries next to the church are the only working Orthodox monasteries in Lithuania.

References:

Comments

Your name

Website (optional)



Details

Founded: 1567
Category: Religious sites in Lithuania

More Information

www.vilnius-tourism.lt

Rating

4.8/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Cett (2 months ago)
Pretty orthodox Church, Great people
issa malki (3 months ago)
Amazing church
David Stankevich (5 months ago)
The church inside looks rich, majestic and impressive. Worth visiting.
Marek Pospieski (6 months ago)
Przepiękna architektura i duchowość wnętrza. Świątynia nie tylko dla wyznawców Prawosławia (...).
Ramunė Vaičiulytė (8 months ago)
Cerkvės ir vienuolyno kompleksas čia veikia nuo 1567 m. Po 1749-1753 m. rekobstrukcijos, kurios autorius J. Glaubicas, cerkvė tapo vienintele barokine stačiatikių šventove Lietuvoje. Cerkvėje ilsisi stačiatikių šventieji Antanas, Jonas ir Eustatijus. O vienuolynų kompleksą sudaro dvi dalys: vyrų Šv. Dvasios vienuolynas (XV-XVI a.) ir moterų Šv. Marijos Magdalietės (XVI a. pab.) Abu vienuolynai veikė net sovietmečiu, abu jų pastatai, nors rekobstruoti, turi gotikinių fragmentų.
Powered by Google

Featured Historic Landmarks, Sites & Buildings

Historic Site of the week

Castle Rushen

Castle Rushen is located in the Isle of Man"s historic capital, Castletown. The castle is amongst the best examples of medieval castles in the British Isles, and is still in use as a court house, museum and educational centre.

The exact date of castle is unknown, although construction is thought to have taken place during the reigns of the late 12th century and early 13th century rulers of the Isle of Man – the Kings of Mann and the Isles. The original Castle Rushen consisted of a central square stone tower, or keep. The site was also fortified to guard the entrance to the Silver Burn. From its early beginnings, the castle was continually developed by successive rulers of Mann between the 13th and 16th century. The limestone walls dominated much of the surrounding landscape, serving as a point of dominance for the various rulers of the Isle of Man. By 1313, the original keep had been reinforced with towers to the west and south. In the 14th century, an east tower, gatehouses, and curtain wall were added.

After several more changes of hands the English and their supporters eventually prevailed. The English king Edward I Longshanks claimed that the island had belonged to the Kings of England for generations and he was merely reasserting their rightful claim to the Isle of Man.

The 18th century saw the castle in steady decay. By the end of the century it was converted into a prison. Even though the castle was in continuous use as a prison, the decline continued until the turn of the 20th century, when it was restored under the oversight of the Lieutenant Governor, George Somerset, 3rd Baron Raglan. Following the restoration work, and the completion of the purpose-built Victoria Road Prison in 1891, the castle was transferred from the British Crown to the Isle of Man Government in 1929.

Today it is run as a museum by Manx National Heritage, depicting the history of the Kings and Lords of Mann. Most rooms are open to the public during the opening season (March to October), and all open rooms have signs telling their stories. The exhibitions include a working medieval kitchen where authentic period food is prepared on special occasions and re-enactments of various aspects of medieval life are held on a regular basis, with particular emphasis on educating the local children about their history. Archaeological finds made during excavations in the 1980s are displayed and used as learning tools for visitors.