Orthodox Holy Spirit Church

Vilnius, Lithuania

The complex of the Holy Spirit church and adjacent monastery was established in 1567. The construction was ordered by the King of Lithuania-Poland Wladyslaw Vasa. By the end of the 16th century, a monastery, a school and a printing shop were situated next to the church. In 1749 the church was badly damaged by fire.

After the reconstruction between 1749-1753 (made by architect January Kristof Glaubic) the church became the only Baroque style Orthodox sanctuary in Lithuania. The interior was crowned by a wooden iconostas resembling the Catholic altar, under which a crypt was built for the relics of Orthodox saints Anthony, John and Eustatius. In 1853 the relics were relocated to a new reliquary. The last reconstruction of the church was accomplished on the initiative of N. Muravyov. The monastery complex comprises two monasteries: the friary of Holy Spirit (built at the intersection in the 15th and 16th centuries) and the convent of Holy Mary Magdalene (built in the late 16th century). Both buildings (reconstructed in the 19th century) have Gothic fragments.

Today Holy Spirit church is the main Orthodox Church in Lithuania. The male and female monasteries next to the church are the only working Orthodox monasteries in Lithuania.

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Details

Founded: 1567
Category: Religious sites in Lithuania

More Information

www.vilnius-tourism.lt

Rating

4.9/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Dina buntov (2 months ago)
Nice church
John Bostic (2 months ago)
Among God's finest
Krystyna Kamińska (6 months ago)
Breathtaking place, worth to visit and feel this atmosphere.
Edmunds Imša (19 months ago)
For spiritual experience. This is not a tourist place
Sandra (19 months ago)
Very nice church. Just be aware that bad people might be met there as well...
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