Museum Ship Pommern & Åland Maritime Museum

Maarianhamina, Finland

The Pommern, formerly the Mneme (1903–1908), is a four-masted barque that was built in 1903 in Glasgow at J. Reid & Co shipyard. It was one of the Flying P-Liners, the famous sailing ships of the German shipping company F. Laeisz. Later she was acquired Gustaf Erikson of the Finnish Åland archipelago, who used the ship to carry grain from the Spencer Gulf area in Australia to harbours in England or Ireland until the start of World War II. After World War Two, she was donated to the town of Mariehamn as a museum ship.

Today Pommern is part of the Åland Maritime Museum representing the history of ship and seafaring in Åland. The Maritime Museum is considered as one of the world’s finest museums related to merchant sailing ships.

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Details

Founded: 1903-1908 (museum ship Pommern
Category: Museums in Finland
Historical period: Russian Grand Duchy (Finland)

Rating

4.5/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Alan Gow (2 years ago)
Great museum with so much to see and learn. Coming here gives a much enhanced experience of being in the Alands as you better appreciate the people and nautical history.
Thomas Collett (2 years ago)
Spent two hours here alone. Lots to see! The pirate flag and Pommern were highlights!
Grunz Pieper (2 years ago)
Very interesting! Can be definitely recommended
Olli Etuaho (2 years ago)
Great museum, good amount of information on display and interesting artifacts. Also has a few more immersive displays of ship interiors.
Johan Westling (2 years ago)
Nice and interesting display of life at sea throughout history. Among the highlight a preserved pirate flag. Great playground for kids. Main exhibitions are accessible for all, but some parts require climbing a sail ship stairs.
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