The Church of St. Olaf

Jomala, Finland

The Church of St. Olaf was built in around 1260-1280s, but the oldest parts may date back to the previous century. The wall paintings decorating the interior is from the 1280s. The present appearance of the church dates from the extensions in the 19th century. Jomala Church is the oldest remaining church in Finland.

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Address

Godbyvägen, Jomala, Finland
See all sites in Jomala

Details

Founded: 1260-1290
Category: Religious sites in Finland
Historical period: Middle Ages (Finland)

Rating

4.4/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Filip N (2 years ago)
Beautiful old church with adjacent graveyard. A nice place to visit for both religious and non-religious people.
Alberto Leonardis (3 years ago)
It was a pity we found it closed. Nevertheless we could enjoy the beautiful structure of massive granit. Easy to reach from Mariehamn bus station, it takes about 15'. The cemetery all around the church is also particular, immersed in absolute peace, among the only whispers of the wind and the branches of the trees.
Alberto Allia (3 years ago)
The oldest church of Aland island. An atmosphere of the past: I had the chance to visit while ceremony was ongoing giving an extra touch of feeling. Around you can find a very quiet and simple cemetery.
Slawomir Malara (3 years ago)
It is really worth to visit this place!
Johnny Ahlström (3 years ago)
Big church for being on Åland. Good acoustics
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