Since the second half of 16th century until 1624 Liškiava church belonged to Protestants. In 1677 a wooden church was rebuilt, and in 1697 the entire town was donated to the Dominican Order. In 1699–1741 a Dominican monastery and in 1704–1720 a brick Holy Trinity church was built in the town. After the partitions of the Polish–Lithuanian Commonwealth in 1795, it was forbidden to accept new monks to the monastery. Since 1852 monastery was reconstructed into living quarters and parsonage. After World War II the building became a school. 1947–1977 it was a recreational base of sartorial factory Lelija.

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Address

2518, Liškiava, Lithuania
See all sites in Liškiava

Details

Founded: 1704-1720
Category: Religious sites in Lithuania

More Information

en.wikipedia.org

Rating

4.7/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Virginia Batuleviciute (5 months ago)
Beautiful church with great acoustic, worth a visit.
Tomasso Da Nille (5 months ago)
Super nice place. I liked the inside the most. Looked very rich
Marius Dirgela (2 years ago)
Very authentic interiors. Magnificent site.
Rolandas S. (3 years ago)
Feels like a big church from a distance, but surprisingly small and cozy on the inside.
Dalia Šeštokienė (4 years ago)
Ši graži bažnyčia alsuoja senove. Įkurta nuostabioje Liškiavos vietoje ant Nemuno kranto. Vaizdas nepakartojamas žiūrint žemyn - kelio vingis , pušynas ir Nemunas. Čia tikrai nuostabu ir reikia tai pamatyti
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