New Hrodna Castle

Hrodna, Belarus

The New Castle in Hrodna, Belarus is the royal palace of Augustus III of Poland and Stanisław August Poniatowski where the infamous Grodno Sejm took place in 1793.

The royal residence was built on the high bank of the Neman River at a little distance from the Old Hrodna Castle which had suffered great dilapidation in the aftermath of the Swedish occupation in the early 18th century. The two castles are joined by a 300-year-old arch bridge.

The palace compound was designed by Carl Friedrich Pöppelmann. Construction was carried out between 1734 and 1751 under the supervision of several other Saxon architects, including Johann Friedrich Knöbel and Joachim Daniel von Jauch. The palace was completed under the direction of Giuseppe de Sacco in 1789 and remained home for King Stanisław II August until 1797.

Used as a hospital and barracks throughout most of the 19th century, the palace was renovated by the Polish administration in the interwar period. Scarcely anything is left of the original fabric of the castle, whose refined Rococo detailing vanished during World War II. There followed a hasty and rather superficial refurbishing of the palace by the Soviets with a view to making it the headquarters of a local obkom.

A plaque on the wall of the palace commemorates the council of war held in the royal residence by Tadeusz Kościuszko on 30 October 1794.

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Founded: 1793
Category: Castles and fortifications in Belarus

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4.5/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Vlad Mikhnevich (2 years ago)
Great historic place!
Владимир GRM (3 years ago)
Отличный объект для того, чтобы заехать сюда на экскурсию. Очень интересно, главное, чтобы был толковый экскурсовод, который бы смог хорошо и подробно, с нюансами и деталями рассказать про интересные моменты из истории этого места. Мне повезло, я приклеился к другой экскурсии, женщина-гид рассказала много неожиданных и интересных моментов. Всем рекомендую будучи в Гродно приехать и сюда тоже!
Кирилл Лузин (3 years ago)
Nice views from Castle mountain
Jamie Polivka (3 years ago)
I think my favorite part was the collections of butterflies and other stuffed animals. My kids loved it too. There is an extensive book collection, which I loved and fellow bibliophiles will find interesting. In Belarus, it is very common to keep all lights off in the rooms until you go into them. So if it isn't busy there will be people following you around (especially if you have kids haha) to turn lights on and to make sure you don't mess with anything. That might seem strange to foreigners, but we've gotten used to it. One of these ladies stayed with us throughout the last floor carrying my youngest and explaining things to him. So friendly and kind.
Evgeniy Ganchits (4 years ago)
A bit too modern building, but worth a visit as it has been the centrepiece of a lot of historical events in Polish and Belarusian history, including the last sejm
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