Kalozha Church

Hrodna, Belarus

The Kalozha church of Saints Boris and Gleb is the oldest extant structure in Hrodna. It is the only surviving monument of ancient Black Ruthenian architecture, distinguished from other Orthodox churches by prolific use of polychrome faceted stones of blue, green or red tint which could be arranged to form crosses or other figures on the wall.

The church is a cross-domed building supported by six circular pillars. The outside is articulated with projecting pilasters, which have rounded corners, as does the building itself. The ante-nave contains the choir loft, accessed by a narrow gradatory in the western wall. Two other stairs were discovered in the walls of the side apses; their purpose is not clear. The floor is lined with ceramic tiles forming decorative patterns. The interior was lined with innumerable built-in pitchers, which usually serve in Eastern Orthodox churches as resonators but in this case were scored to produce decorative effects. For this reason, the central nave has never been painted.

The church was built before 1183 and survived intact, depicted in the 1840s by Michał Kulesza, until 1853, when the south wall collapsed, due to its perilous location on the high bank of the Neman. During restoration works, some fragments of 12th-century frescoes were discovered in the apses. Remains of four other churches in the same style, decorated with pitchers and coloured stones instead of frescoes, were discovered in Hrodna and Vaŭkavysk. They all date back to the turn of the 13th century, as do remains of the first stone palace in the Old Hrodna Castle.

In 2004, the church was included in the Tentative List of UNESCO's World Heritage Sites.

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Details

Founded: 1183
Category: Religious sites in Belarus

More Information

en.wikipedia.org

Rating

4.8/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Mehul Sadadiwala (9 months ago)
A peaceful place.
Vlad Mikhnevich (10 months ago)
Historic place
Tautginas Gelžinis (10 months ago)
Amazing 800 years old Church
Ольга Бессараб (11 months ago)
Церковь уникальна, прежде всего, тем, что является сохранившимся образцом древнерусского каменного зодчества XI-XII вв. Территория вокруг неплохо благоустроена, рядом есть смотровая площадка с видом на Неман. В настоящее время (ноябрь 2018) часть наружных стен обложена каким-то материалом типа вагонки, что заметно нарушает внешний вид. Удобный подход к церкви - через Коложский парк. По набережной тоже имеется проход, но дорога не благоустроена.
O Roceiro Viajante (2 years ago)
The most beautiful monument in Grodno
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