Lithuanian Art Museum

Vilnius, Lithuania

The Lithuanian Art Museum was initially established in Vilnius in 1933 as the Vilnius City Museum. It houses Lithuania's largest art collection. The collections at the museum include about 2,500 paintings dated from the 16th to the 19th Century; these consist mostly of portraits of nobility and clergy of the Lithuanian Grand Duchy from the 16th to the 18th centuries, and religious works from Lithuanian churches and cloisters. Over 8,000 drawings by Italian, German, French, Flemish, Dutch, Polish, English, and Japanese artists from the 15th to the 20th century are represented.

The first half of the 20th century has an extensive presence, with over 12,000 works. The collection from the second half of the 20th century features more than 21,000 exhibits. Sculpture collections span the 14th through 20th centuries, with works from a number of European countries. Other notable collections include works done in watercolor and pastel, and photography.

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Details

Founded: 1933
Category: Museums in Lithuania

More Information

www.ldm.lt
en.wikipedia.org

Rating

4.4/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Aurimas Ožekauskas (8 months ago)
If you like art you must this place. Here you will find a largest Lithuanians art collection. Staff was very friendly. Ticket price is 2€ and you can take pictures here but without flash.
Angelos (8 months ago)
Very good and not expensive for students
Buceo Acp (11 months ago)
Well presented museum. Good insight into local art.
Chris Torres (11 months ago)
Inexpensive, very quick visit if you have some time to kill.
Ramunė Vaičiulytė (14 months ago)
If you come here, let yourself to be amazed of the buikfing beauty. It is Lithuanian noble family Chodkiewicz estate. Formed in the Gothic and Renaissance, today building is late Classical. And lots of Lithuanian famous people are connected to that building history. So, look around and come in. :)
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