Kretinga Monastery

Kretinga, Lithuania

In 1602 Jan Karol Chodkiewicz built the first wooden church in Kretinga and established a Benedictine monastery, which became a great success. After about ten years a new brick church with an impressive organ was built. In 1610 a church school was opened. In 1621 the Sapieha family gained control of the city; they changed its coat of arms to represent Saint Casimir. In 1659 and 1710 the church and monastery were destroyed by Swedish armies. The Sapieha family helped to rebuild and improve it.

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Founded: 1602
Category: Religious sites in Lithuania

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4.5/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Neringa DubietytÄ— (4 years ago)
Everything is great
Petras Zaboras (4 years ago)
Women's Monastery. There is a chapel. It holds worship services. Franciscan brothers hold the service.
Brolis Paulius (4 years ago)
Holy Sisters???
ses.Sandrone Stasauskaite (4 years ago)
Often there was a visit because sister Stanislava was joining, there was a net4 year.It is a closed monastery, but a very good place and the most important spiritual practice.
Dovy PS (4 years ago)
Each serfdom takes place on mission
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