Långe Jan ("Tall John") is a Swedish lighthouse located at the south cape of Öland. It is one of Sweden's most famous lighthouses and also the tallest lighthouse in Sweden. The lighthouse was built in 1785, probably by Russian prisoner of wars. The tower was built by stone from an old chapel. Originally the light was an open fire, and the tower was unpainted. It was painted white in 1845, and the same year the tower's lantern was installed, to store a colza oil lamp. A couple of years later a black band was added to the tower.

The lighthouse remains in use and is remote-controlled by the Swedish Maritime Administration in Norrköping. During the summer-season it is possible to climb the tower, for a small fee. The buildings surrounding the tower is Ottenby birding station.

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Founded: 1785
Category:
Historical period: The Age of Enlightenment (Sweden)

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4.4/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Sarah Ruth Schmidt Gradén (2 years ago)
There's a big lighthouse (biggest in Sweden) and a restaurant. Given, we were here in the off season, but it doesn't seem there's much else any other time of year. But, apparently, if you're into bird watching this is the place. There were so many cameras on tripods standing outside the cafe that it was clear that's whatnot people were there for.
Shahriar Munir (2 years ago)
Must visit place.
Patrik Wallner (2 years ago)
During covid-19 they only allow 15 persons per hour to go up. If you plan you can book a time and go eat lunch while waiting. Amazing road leading up to the place, be prepared for cows and sheep on the road.
Sebastian Barrientos Klepec (2 years ago)
Way more than I expected!
tinto babu (2 years ago)
Really great place for bird lovers and possibility of seeing seals. Highly recommend to have binocular. But it is really long queue to enter the light house.
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