Långe Jan ("Tall John") is a Swedish lighthouse located at the south cape of Öland. It is one of Sweden's most famous lighthouses and also the tallest lighthouse in Sweden. The lighthouse was built in 1785, probably by Russian prisoner of wars. The tower was built by stone from an old chapel. Originally the light was an open fire, and the tower was unpainted. It was painted white in 1845, and the same year the tower's lantern was installed, to store a colza oil lamp. A couple of years later a black band was added to the tower.

The lighthouse remains in use and is remote-controlled by the Swedish Maritime Administration in Norrköping. During the summer-season it is possible to climb the tower, for a small fee. The buildings surrounding the tower is Ottenby birding station.

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Founded: 1785
Category:
Historical period: The Age of Enlightenment (Sweden)

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4.4/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Zecret W (6 months ago)
Nice place with a view. A "must" if you visit Öland but beware of the many steps to the top to enjoy the view. You can also spot lots of birds and seals in the shallow waters.
johnstearne68 (6 months ago)
Lovely place to see on your Swedish holiday on the Southernmost tip of Oland.Nice nature and bird conservation museum and good views from the top of the lighthouse
Andreas Hagelin (7 months ago)
A must see when in Öland with a spectacular view.
Ville Ällä (7 months ago)
The road here along the western coast was fairly terrible to cycle (due to traffic and no room beyond the white line), and it was very crowded (early August), but the view was worth it -- both from up in the lighthouse and along the way there, where there are those black cows & sheep grazing on the open fields right next to the road.
Anna Nilsson (7 months ago)
Very picturesque lighthouse at the tip of Öland-beautiful surroundings. You can actually walk up the lighthouse, but I was not physically able to do that this visit. Next time!! The cafeteria style restaurant serves very good food with a wide selection and a spectacular view of the water. There is the bird sanctuary Ottenby you can walk through, plus an old burial ground from the iron age within driving distance right before you exit the reserve. Also, during the summer you can stop by the Ottenby Royal Manor and enjoy the art gallery.
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