Långe Jan ("Tall John") is a Swedish lighthouse located at the south cape of Öland. It is one of Sweden's most famous lighthouses and also the tallest lighthouse in Sweden. The lighthouse was built in 1785, probably by Russian prisoner of wars. The tower was built by stone from an old chapel. Originally the light was an open fire, and the tower was unpainted. It was painted white in 1845, and the same year the tower's lantern was installed, to store a colza oil lamp. A couple of years later a black band was added to the tower.

The lighthouse remains in use and is remote-controlled by the Swedish Maritime Administration in Norrköping. During the summer-season it is possible to climb the tower, for a small fee. The buildings surrounding the tower is Ottenby birding station.

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Founded: 1785
Category:
Historical period: The Age of Enlightenment (Sweden)

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4.4/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Sarah Ruth Schmidt Gradén (6 months ago)
There's a big lighthouse (biggest in Sweden) and a restaurant. Given, we were here in the off season, but it doesn't seem there's much else any other time of year. But, apparently, if you're into bird watching this is the place. There were so many cameras on tripods standing outside the cafe that it was clear that's whatnot people were there for.
Shahriar Munir (7 months ago)
Must visit place.
Patrik Wallner (9 months ago)
During covid-19 they only allow 15 persons per hour to go up. If you plan you can book a time and go eat lunch while waiting. Amazing road leading up to the place, be prepared for cows and sheep on the road.
Sebastian Barrientos Klepec (9 months ago)
Way more than I expected!
tinto babu (9 months ago)
Really great place for bird lovers and possibility of seeing seals. Highly recommend to have binocular. But it is really long queue to enter the light house.
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The settlement of Trepucó is one of the largest on Menorca, covering an area of around 49,240 square metres. Today, only a small part of the site can still be seen, the two oldest buildings, the talaiots (1000-700 BCE). Other remains include parts of the wall, two square towers on the west wall, the taula enclosure and traces of dwellings from the post-Talayotic period (650-123 BCE).The taula enclosure is one of the biggest on the island, despite having been subjected to what, by today’s standards, would be considered clumsy restoration work. This is one of the sites excavated around 1930 by Margaret Murray, a British archaeologist who was a pioneer of scientific research on Prehistoric Menorca.

The houses are perfectly visible on the west side of the settlement, due to excavation work carried out several years ago. They are multi-lobed with a central patio area and several rooms arranged around the outside. Looking at the settlement, it is easy to see that there was a clear division between the communal area (between the large talaiot and the taula) and the domestic area.The houses near the smaller talaiot seem to have been abandoned at short notice, meaning that the archaeological dig uncovered exceptionally well-preserved domestic implements, now on display in the Museum of Menorca.The larger talayot and the taula stand at the centre of a star-shaped fortification built during the 18th century.